Episode 97: Should your MSP run Google ads?

Episode 97: Should your MSP run Google ads?

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Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Episode 97: Should your MSP run Google ads?
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In this week’s episode

  • Of course you’d love to appear at the very top of Google when a ‘hot buyer’ is searching for a new MSP. In many cases you’d need to use Google Ads to achieve this… but are they really worth it? This week Paul dives into the pros and cons of Google Ads for MSPs
  • Also on the show this week, it’s the second half of Paul’s masterclass on PR. Listen for 10 practical killer ideas for generating free publicity
  • Plus, what is a ‘buyer persona’ and how can your MSP use one to out-smart the competition? All this and more is answered by Paul’s featured guest this week, Stormie Andrews

Featured guest

Stormie Andrews is a guest on Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast

Thank you to Stormie Andrews from the Yokel Local marketing agency for joining Paul to talk about how to outsmart the competition by creating a fictitious buyer persona.

Stormie’s passion is to make it much easier for organisations to attract their ideal clients by understanding how their prospects think in order to experience what it’s like to achieve ridiculous growth. Stormie is a recognised Member of the Year from the American Marketing Association, named as a Top 50 Tech Visionary by Intercon in 2020-2021, and his book, “The Worlds Best Buyer Persona System“, became an Amazon Hot New Releases Best Seller when released in July of 2020.

Connect with Stormie on LinkedIn.

Show notes

  • Out every Tuesday on your favourite podcast platform
  • Presented by Paul Green, an MSP marketing expert
  • In discussing the benefits of Google Ads, Paul recommended listening back to Episode 88 for a conversation with an MSP who uses Google Ads heavily
  • Listen back to Episode 96 for part one of the conversation on PR and getting free publicity
  • Find out more about Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Edge
  • Many thanks to Kevin Coppins from Spirion for recommending the book Predictable Success by Les McKeown
  • On September 28th Paul will be joined by Jonno White from Clarity to talk about how deal with difficult people when you hate conflict
  • Got a question from the show? Email Paul directly: hello@paulgreensmspmarketing.com

Episode transcription

Voiceover:
Fresh every Tuesday for MSP’s around the world, this is Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
It’s really great to have you here. Here’s what we got coming up on this week’s show.

Stormie Andrews:
Often times people approach me wanting to outsell, outgrow their competition, the best way of doing it is outsmarting the competition.

Paul Green:
We’re also going to be finishing off something we started in last week’s podcast about the difference between PR and paid advertising and why your MSP really needs to pursue more PR and try and get more free publicity. We’ll finish that off today and I’ll also tell you about a service, which will give you a press release every single month. Something that you can just send out to the local media without having to do any work at all. All of this is coming up later in the show.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
The question of whether or not your MSP should run Google ads, those pay per click ads, where you only pay when someone clicks on the ad, the question of whether or not you should run them is a really interesting one. Because at first glance, the surface answer appears to be no, but when you look a little bit deeper, there’s a bit of a maybe in there and maybe even a yes, depending on a series of different factors. Let me start at the beginning, so Google ads have been traditionally just the most wonderful way to reach people who are ready to buy or nearly ready to buy what it is that you sell. And in fact, it’s the ads that’s made Google rich and famous and rich beyond their wildest dreams. Certainly Larry and Sergey, the original founders of Google who are now tucked away in their probably very well-protected mansion’s counting their multiple millions, if not billions of dollars, they got rich on advertising revenue.

Paul Green:
If you boil it down, Google’s very innovative company with lots of products and lots of different things, but their money was made through advertising. They back in the very late 90s, early noughties, figured out a way to make advertising relevant. And these days we take it for granted, but you go back 23, 24 years, and most of the advertising then was kind of spray and pray. You literally put an advert in your local newspaper or on your local radio station or in a magazine or something and you hoped that the right people would see it, which was fine for people who were selling, bathrooms, plumbers, those kinds of things. But what about IT support? If you were advertising in a magazine, how did you know that the people who were reading that magazine were decision makers, the fact is you didn’t.

Paul Green:
Google for the first time ever, actually I don’t think they were the first, but they were the first to do it at scale. They ensured that when you type something in, whatever someone typed in, you could ask for your advert to be shown. And essentially it was like an auction, well, it still is like an auction system. So you would say if someone types in, let’s say, for example, IT support, please show my advert and I am willing to pay this amount of money if someone clicks it. The idea being that someone who has typed in IT support your town say, is more likely to be a relevant prospect. And then because there were lots of people who were willing to do this, it became a bit of an auction. So if you were willing to pay $2 per click and your competitors were only willing to pay $1 per click, then you would appear higher.

Paul Green:
Now, there are a whole series of other rules that Google introduced over the years, such as quality score and click through rate and all sorts of things like that. I’m not an expert at Google ads, but I know that these rules are there and they made it more complicated over time. But for a while there, for a good five, 10 years or so, Google traffic was cheap and you were paying cents, literally cents per click. I have a friend who built up a training company off the back of cheap Google traffic. And he said to me, a few years ago, he couldn’t pull off the same trick again today because he was spending tens of thousands of pounds, he’s British, tens of thousands of pounds a month, driving traffic from Google, but he was generating hundreds of thousands of pounds of revenue off that cheap traffic.

Paul Green:
Well, these days it would cost him more than the revenue he could generate from it, Google has changed the game so much, and this is what makes Google frustrating because we know that if someone types in, new IT support company in your town into Google, you just love to be in front of them at that exact moment, but the price, the price is so high these days. Google made a series of changes a few years ago, which limited the number of adverts. Do you remember there used to be quite a few adverts up at the top, and then you’d have adverts down the side of the search results and then there’d be more adverts down in the bottom? Well, they got rid of all of that and now you’ve just got three adverts up at the top and the adverts look like organic listings. How did they pull that trick off? They did that in front of us and no one really noticed.

Paul Green:
So Google restricted the amount of advertising available, that of course, drove the price up even more because it’s basic economics there, where demand for something is high and supply is low, the price goes up. It’s pretty much all I remember from my economics A level, that one. So Google has been very clever at pushing that price up and making everything very expensive, well done, Google, but the downside is for us that it is quite expensive to advertise for new clients. And then you’ve got to bear in mind as well, there’s a lot of wastage. I have a few clients that do Google ads, one in particular who put himself through a Udemy course, you know Udemy, the online platform where you can go and learn pretty much anything? He did that course, it was about 20, 25 hours and he then self optimised his own Google ads. And he’s done very well from it, but there’s a lot of wastage and he gets a lot of clicks, but he wants business owners, managers, the same people as you.

Paul Green:
And he will get a lot of people clicking through and it’s like, can you help me? I’ve cracked my iPad screen and it’s some bloke at home, and that’s not really what he wants. But here’s the thing that client in particular, in fact, some of my other clients who also do Google ads and swear by it and you’ll have heard Jamie Warner say the same thing, if you go back to episode 88, which was a special episode, featuring an MSP called Jamie Warner, it’s an excellent episode to listen to. All of these people, they maintain their Google ads, despite the cost and despite the noise and you know why they do it? They do it because now and again, you get a genuine good lead. And you’ve got to look at it this way, let’s say you spend $5,000 a month on Google ads, let’s just say, and let’s say that you get one decent lead every three months and that decent lead converts into a client, what’s a new client worth to you over its lifetime? We call this average lifetime value.

Paul Green:
And actually for most MSPs, the average lifetime value of a new client is really high because they might be paying you one, £2000 a month and they’re going to do that every single month for at least five years, if not 10 years because you’re really good at keeping the clients, right? So even if someone is only spending a thousand dollars a month and you keep them for 10 years, that’s £120,000 worth of business. And sure, you’ve got to stick around for 10 years to collect that, although you could sell that contract onto someone else when you come to exit the business. But you get the idea £120,000 and let’s say that did cost you 10, $15,000 to generate that, that’s actually not a bad return on investment. Okay, you have to keep them for a year to get your cash back, but I reckon off that five, 10, $15,000 you spend, you’ll get other clients as well, it’s just they won’t have come through the pay per click.

Paul Green:
You can’t necessarily track them back to that Google ad, but it got them onto your website in the first place. And maybe then they subscribed to your newsletter or started following you on social media or connected to you on LinkedIn or read what was on your website. And maybe one day they picked up the phone and they can’t remember, they clicked a Google ad, they probably not even aware it was an ad because it looks so much like an organic listing. This is the right way to think about Google ads. If you have the cash to spare, you should absolutely set yourself up with some Google ads so that you have a presence. It’s all about dominating the digital footprint when someone goes looking for IT support companies, and there are lots and lots of little details.

Paul Green:
You should definitely get a company to do this for you, or as my client did go onto Udemy, buy the training course, there are lots of them there. I think it’s the best selling one is the one that you want to go for, it’s had literally 20, 30,000 sales and put yourself through that and learn what actually makes the difference with Google ads about keywords, negative keywords and all of that kind of stuff. But I do think if you’ve got the cash to do it, you should do it. There’s two reasons why you probably wouldn’t do it. One is if you’re in a super busy area or the other is if you’re in an area where actually there’s just not a lot of people, and this is something Jamie Warner mentioned back in episode 88. He was saying, if you’re in the middle of nowhere and there’s just not that much Google activity happening, then it’s kind of not worth being on Google. It’s one of those things, the only way to find out is actually to try an advertising campaign and set a big geographical area.

Paul Green:
I think the reverse applies, that if you’re in a massive city, if you’re in Los Angeles where there’s about 500 MSPs in Los Angeles, I don’t know if that’s an accurate figure, but it’s certainly what it feels like. I know Los Angeles is the area we could sell literally 30 times over with our MSP marketing edge. We have one MSP that has it, and we have a very long waiting list for Los Angeles. So if you were there and you were trying to rank highly and make sure your advert was shown for the search term, IT support Los Angeles, there’s a lot of competition for that. So in that instance, it might just not be worth it. But for the vast majority of other areas in most Western market, it’s got to at least be worth an experiment, give yourself three months, set a budget for three months, get someone to do it for you, or get educated to do it. Try it as a three-month experiment. It’s only got to generate one client and it’s paid for itself many times over.

Voiceover:
Here’s this week’s clever idea.

Paul Green:
Last week on the show, we talked about the theory of PR, public relations or getting free publicity. And if you haven’t listened back to that, it really would be worth perhaps before you listen to this bit, just nipping back one episode and listening to what I was talking about last week. Today, I’ve got for you some practical stuff, some actual things that you can do to get yourself free publicity. And the first thing to do is to write a press release. So I taught last week about story suggestions, that’s all the press release is, it’s your way of suggesting a story to your local media. And writing a press release is actually easy, press releases are a tool, that’s all they are, they’re a tool of public relations. Now, writing a press release and sending it out in itself, won’t get you media coverage. But if you can create a press release, that’s used as a tool to communicate a great story to a journalist, that is a different matter.

Paul Green:
It’s like when you’re just selling stuff in the business, if you’ve got something that people really want, it doesn’t matter if your website isn’t quite right or your marketing, your sales literature isn’t particularly effective. If people want it, then sure, those things will diminish your sales, but they won’t affect the basic demand for these things. And it’s the same with PR, if you’ve got a relevant story that’s packed with standout ability, journalists will want it. Now, if you can’t write a press release particularly well, it might make it harder for you to communicate the story, but ultimately if it’s good enough, journalists will want it anyway. So the most reliable way to communicate a story to a journalist is to send out a press release and then follow that press release up by phone. I mean, you can call them by phone before, but most of the time they’ll just say, “Hey, send me an email, send me a press release.”

Paul Green:
So I found, and I did actually run a PR company for a couple of years, so I’ve been both sides, I’ve been the journalist and I’ve been the PR person, that didn’t enjoy doing PR. But the best thing to do is send out the press release and 24 hours later pick up the phone, or maybe even just a few hours later, pick up the phone, call them and say, not just, “Hi, did you get my press release?” Because I hear that a thousand times a day. But I sent over a story suggestion to you, summarise it in three seconds, is that something I can help you with? And nine times out of 10, they’ll go. No, or they won’t know what it is, but do you know what? Just that little follow-up phone call, which not many people do can be quite helpful at flagging things up to the journalist. So you need to be able to communicate in a written form and journalists like to see written versions of the story you’re suggesting just because it makes it easy for them to write their version of the story.

Paul Green:
So whether you’re putting together a press release or even just emailing over in a basic way, these are the basic elements that you need. The first is an attention catching headline. Now, just as newspapers, use a great headline to catch your attention and try and hook you into the story, you’ve got to do the same thing with your press release or your email. Next, you need a good opening paragraph because news editors or the journalists, will decide whether to run the story or to bin the press release and press delete just on the strength of the headline and the opening paragraph. They don’t read the whole thing, they really don’t. If you don’t hook them with a headline in that opening paragraph, then they’re just going to delete what you’ve got. Next, you go into the main body and this is where you spell out your story using those five unbreakable rules of free publicity that we talked about last week.

Paul Green:
And of course, you make sure you give them the whole story with the five W words from last week, who, what, where, when and why. Then you must use a quote where you can because people like reading about people, that’s really what all stories are about. So give a quote from someone, you commenting on the story and really you should just keep that to one person. And then at the very end, you write a section called notes to editors. Now, this is code to journalist, it’s a way to say here’s some information that I don’t really want to see published. So you would give them your phone number, you would give them your email address and you could say, if he wants to arrange a photo or do an interview, here’s how you can get in touch. And it’s a way of guaranteeing that they’re not going to publish your contact details. So once you’ve got your press release, your story suggestion, you’ve got to send it to the right journalists.

Paul Green:
Now, most journalists prefer receiving press releases by email, so even if you do speak to them on the phone, they will normally ask you to email something over. You never ever send a word attachment unless specifically asked, most media outlets just prefer that you paste the copy, paste the body of your press release into the email. In fact, what you do is you put the headline of your press release as the subject line of your email, and then you paste the body of it into the body of your email. If you’re going to email, press releases to several journalists at once, then either send those emails out one at a time or put all of the email addresses into the BCC field or better still just use an email marketing tool such as MailChimp. Now, you can build a powerful media list of your local contacts or the contacts in your vertical really easily. The first thing you’ve got to do is decide on your media sector. So for most MSPs, it’s just your local media, as I say for verticals, it will be the trade magazines, the websites, all of that kind of stuff.

Paul Green:
And then you find out the names of all the target media outlets. This is really easy because you just use Google for this. There are actually some websites out there which if you Google, find names of media outlets, you’ll find a website for your country. There are certainly websites in the UK, there’s things like mediauk.com. There’s one in the States that I found, I can’t remember what it is off the top of my head, but you can find it really easily, list of media outlets, and you can normally then search by geographical areas. And once you found the names of the media titles, all the radio stations, newspapers, and new sites, just go and have a look on their websites. And you can have a look at the kind of stories that they publish and then look for how to contact them. There’s normally a general email address, such as news@newspapertitle.com, that’s okay. Typically, those kinds of general inboxes do get read by someone that at least looks at them two to three times a day to see what story suggestions are coming out.

Paul Green:
So let me finally finish with 10 killer ideas for you for free publicity. Now, some ideas are so powerful that they do generate publicity for businesses year after year after year. In my media career, I kept seeing variations of these ideas come up. So when I started my PR company, these were the story ideas that we used to generate publicity for our clients. The first idea is to be the first or the newest or the oldest or the biggest or the smallest, because this makes you different and different is great. Remember journalists get sent a constant stream of average all day long. I promise you if you were to sit there and see the dross that turns up in their inbox. So something that’s different by being the first, the newest, the oldest, the biggest, the smallest, whatever it is, then it stands out instantly. Number two is to introduce something new or improved, make it clear what’s better and why and what problem it solves. And remember, it’s got to be relevant to their target audience.

Paul Green:
So the fact that you have upgraded your security stack is not of interest to your target audience, but new ransomware might be of interest to your target audience. Number three, mark the passage of time, has it been a year, five years or 10 years since something significant happened? Not necessarily something significant to your business, but something of significance to the target audience. Number four, win a big contract, don’t be afraid to boast, big contracts do attract other big contracts. Number five is to react to a current story, so give your opinion on something that’s been in the news, either nationally or locally, that’s relevant to you and to the target audience. Number six, offer free information. You’ve got years of experience in your profession, and that makes you an expert, journalists and readers appreciate an expert’s opinion, give it away.

Paul Green:
Number seven, you could offer a series of articles, share your expertise, help these media outlets to fill up their webpages with interesting new content. And don’t worry too much about your writing skills, they employ editors and sub-editors to shape your stuff before it ever gets published. You could write just three or four articles, which they might publish throughout a year, what a great way? In fact, you become a columnist for the local media, how cool would that be? Number eight is to survey your clients, find out what people think about specific issues related to technology. And if they’re within the target audience, if they’re the kind of business owners and managers that will read these news outlets, then the media will not be able to resist, they do love a survey. Number nine is to spot a trend and comment on it. And this is really easy for us because there are so many things happening in our world. And there are lots of IT blogs that will spot these trends for you.

Paul Green:
You can actually turn yourself into a commentator on our industry, not within our industry, but for your local media, because remember that few people, except the other MSPs in your area know about the kind of stuff that you read and the blogs that we read every day, the IT blogs, there is an endless source of ideas there for you. And the final one, number 10 is to be anti corporate, journalists actually get the most press releases from big businesses that employ PR companies or they’ve got internal PR company and those press releases are so dull. So actually be anti-corporate, don’t be afraid to stand out, look at the people who get the most publicity in life and it’s people like Richard Branson, they’re very good at standing out because they’re very anti-corporate. What can you do to stand out to the journalists that you want to reach?

Voiceover:
Pools, blatant plug.

Paul Green:
And this week it relates directly to what we’ve been talking about with PR because I give my clients a press release every single month. They’re the clients of my MSP marketing edge service, now trusted by more than 500 MSPs all over the world. It’s not just the press release they get every month, they get a whole ton of other stuff. They get guides, videos, emails, social media, there’s tools, some incredible marketing tools that they can use in their business, including a book that’s been written for them about email security. There’s an IT services buyer’s guide, there’s a plugin for websites. We’ve got a load of hackers videos, you can watch a hacker hacking. You see it from his computer and from the victim’s computer, all of this is included and it is an absolute steal. It’s just £99 plus VAT every month, if you’re in the UK and if you’re in the US or anywhere else, it’s just $129 a month. There’s no contracts, cancel any time, go and see the details of it at mspmarketingedge.com.

Paul Green:
Oh, and did I forget to tell you, we only sell it to one MSP per area. So go and see if another MSP has already beaten you to your area at mspmarketingedge.com.

Voiceover:
The big interview.

Stormie Andrews:
Hey there, this is Stormie Andrews, creator of the World’s Best Buyer Persona system and co-founder of Yokel Local Marketing.

Paul Green:
And I’m so excited to have you on the podcast Stormie because you have been very highly recommended to me, particularly to talk about buyer personas. Now, this isn’t something that we’ve covered off in huge detail on the podcast before, so let’s start right at the beginning. Can you explain to us what is a buyer persona?

Stormie Andrews:
Pretty easy. A buyer persona is essentially a fictional representation of your ideal client.

Paul Green:
Simple as that.

Stormie Andrews:
I mean, that’s it, it’s who is your ideal client, identifying your ideal client, their pain point, their struggles, the way they interact with you and your business, and being able to document that and figuring out a way to attract more of those people. So you can do business with the people you want to do business with versus doing business with just whoever you can do business with, big difference.

Paul Green:
So you figure out who you want to do business with, and then you create a fictitious character that almost represents that person.

Stormie Andrews:
Absolutely. You nailed it

Paul Green:
Well, there we go, I could write a book on this. It sounds like your book is going to be very short, to be honest, Stormie. That was a joke. So what’s the point of doing this? What’s the purpose of doing this? Because I can see how for the average MSP owner listening to this, they’d think, well, that’s just nonsense, that’s a silly thing to do. Now, I say that knowing that actually buyer personas are incredibly powerful things to do, but you explain to us why it makes such a difference when you create this fictitious character.

Stormie Andrews:
Yes. So if you think about, let’s think of the typical MSP owner, they’re running their business and they do business typically, with whoever comes through the door, they do business with whoever they can get to do business with them. And the scenario is sometimes each and every one of them have run into scenarios to where they’re meeting someone that they’re about to sign an agreement with. And they know that this is probably not going to be the best fit, but because of budgetary constraints, sales goals, whatever it may be, they end up doing business with them anyway, only to possibly regret that decision later on in the future, happens all the time. So what the buyer persona does is or the system that I’ve created, the World’s Best Buyer Persona System, it really gets into the weeds. It gets into the emotions, the pain points, the triggering events, noise in the marketplace to help MSPs create messaging that’s designed to resonate, connect with and attract the type of people that they want to do business with, people who value their position in the marketplace, who values their authority, who values their positioning factors.

Stormie Andrews:
And if you have the ability of documenting it and doing a really good job of documenting it, it impacts your messaging. Whether that messaging be on social media, whether it be on any type of advertising or posts, it allows for MSPs to have consistent unified messaging that’s designed to resonate on an emotional level with the people they want to do business with.

Paul Green:
That makes perfect sense. So you target all of your marketing at that ideal buyer persona, that person you really want to buy it from you. So let’s look at your system again. What was that system called Stormie?

Stormie Andrews:
It’s called the World’s Best Buyer Persona System.

Paul Green:
I love how you’ve been really humble about that, it’s a good start. Tell us what the first step is then and how do we get started creating a buyer persona?

Stormie Andrews:
So the first thing we have to do is ideally look at your customer base, look at the people you like doing business with, what are their commonalities? And also look at the people you don’t like doing business with, because we know that there are some of them, but we want to spend the time looking at the individuals that you have, that you wish you could have more of. And we start documenting what happens with that individual? Why are they looking for your services? Why now? What are the triggering events? What are typical triggering events that have happened to make them want to do business with you right now? And then combining that information with their emotions. Oftentimes messaging is full of lots of logic, but individuals don’t make decisions based on logic, there are numerous studies that suggest that people who we’re doing business with, 80% of our decisions are based on emotion.

Stormie Andrews:
So if we can spend time working through a process, identifying what emotions are they going through now, as they’re realising that they have some sort of a pain point that an MSP could resolve, when they’re in the awareness stage and what type of information would be beneficial to that person, without the typical sales pressure. Maybe when they’re in the consideration stage, what type of, how should your messaging differ for that particular person in the consideration stage versus the decision stage? Combine that with messaging that’s designed to set you apart from the competition, based on the needs, wants and desires of your ideal client, versus what typically happens is based on what we feel is important and there’s usually a mismatch. When an MSP decided to open their doors and say, “Hey, we’re in business, we’re going to attract people,” normally like any business owner across any industry, we start identifying and putting messaging out there in regards to the business that’s important to us as the business owner, not thinking about the ideal client.

Stormie Andrews:
And when we think about the ideal client and we think about changing our messaging to benefit them, it’s miraculous. It is incredible how the process of lead conversions and trust is built. It’s a process that really is designed to set you apart from other competitors in your space.

Paul Green:
It’s very powerful. I agree with everything you’ve said there, especially about putting the emotions back into your marketing and not looking at it logically. And that’s something that I think many business owners, not just MSPs, but many business owners get completely wrong. So in your experience, Stormie, and I’m guessing you’ve done this with thousands and thousands of different businesses, but in your experience, is this something that your average overworked business owner can easily do, and in fact, should do?

Stormie Andrews:
100%. One of the reasons I put out the book, it turned out to be Amazon new release as bestseller is because I walk them through the process where they have worksheets that they can download, and I will walk them through the process step-by-step and the feedback that I get from organisations is no less than anything that’s incredible. It’s really transformed businesses. You see, prior to founding Yokel Local back in 2010, I used to travel the country, speaking to organisations in regards to being an effective communicator. I was fortunate enough to co-author books with Jack Canfield and Brian Tracy, and I would speak on effective communication techniques. And that’s when the world used to communicate belly-to-belly, face-to-face. Well, then this thing called the internet started taking over. And if we think of our digital assets, as employees, as salespeople, as customer service reps, they’re pretty lousy communicators. You have to train them as you would train any other employee and I don’t believe most organisations think of their digital assets as employees.

Stormie Andrews:
If they did, they would train them to be a better sales person, they would train them to be a better spokesperson, they would train them to be a better customer service person, because oftentimes your digital assets, your digital messaging is going to be the first interaction that a stranger is going to have with your organisation. And you don’t want to blow that opportunity. So when I started Yokel Local back in 2010, I pondered, how can we make digital assets communicate better? And it was a very arduous and difficult process. I wanted to take my skillset and convert it to the digital realm. That process took me over seven years to figure out a system that I would call the world’s best and have peers in the industry recognise it as the world’s best system for creating buyer personas.

Stormie Andrews:
And last year I came up with a book to walk people through the process, because what happens is large organisations, they typically have the resources to hire me to walk their organisation through it, but a lot of your smaller businesses, don’t. The book gives them for 20 bucks, I have a step-by-step process to guide them through the process in a few hours.

Paul Green:
Fantastic. So tell us more about the book then, where can we get hold of it, and also tell us about your business, which has, got to say, it’s got to have one of the best names I’ve ever heard, Yokel Local, that’s such a great name.

Stormie Andrews:
Awesome, thanks. So the book it’s available wherever books are sold, whether that be Amazon, Barnes & Noble, any of your online book retailers, the book is called World’s Best Buyer Persona System, read the reviews, they’ve been overwhelming. A few of the reviews have really brought tears to my eyes because it is impacting the market just the way I had hoped. And the company Yokel Local, oftentimes I get a question like, why would you name a company Yokel Local? Well, a Yokel is someone who understands the landscape better than anyone else. And oftentimes when I meet with business owners, they’re lost in regards to this digital landscape. They don’t know who to turn to, but if they can find a Yokel, someone who understands that landscape, someone that can lead them to safety, well, and if that’s what they’re looking for, that’s me. So that’s what Yokel Local does, we are a HubSpot agency partner, as a matter of fact, the first platinum HubSpot agency partner within the State of Nevada, the first and only.

Stormie Andrews:
And we’ve had a great relationship and have a great relationship with HubSpot, helping organisations implement their inbound marketing strategies and combining inbound marketing with a World’s Best Buyer Persona System also helps alignment with sales. It has had an incredible impact on countless organisations.

Paul Green:
And give us your website address, finally.

Stormie Andrews:
So my website address is yokellocal.com, makes it pretty easy. When you buy, if you decide to buy the book, I have various websites that you can go to that gives you access to free resources and the resources really won’t serve you any purpose without having the book to guide you along. But yokellocal.com.com is the website for my business. If you’re looking for someone to come out and speak to your organisation in regards to workshops and training, when it comes to the World’s Best Buyer Persona System, you can go to stormieandrews.com that Stormie with an IE andrews.com and the book can be found wherever fine books are sold.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast. This week’s recommended book.

Kevin Coppins:
Hi, my name’s Kevin Coppins from Spirion. I want to recommend a book by an author by the name of Les McKeown, it’s called Predictable Success, written about the journey that all organisations go through. From that first start of the struggle, the early start of the first few employees, all the way up to a point of predictable success and then even past that, when organisations start getting a little bit over their ski tips. I think the conversations that he has about the life cycles of the business are the most relevant and most meaningful ones that I’ve seen in a book. So I highly recommend Les McKeown’s, Predictable Success.

Voiceover:
Coming up next week.

Jonno White:
Hi, this is Jonno White, I’m the founder and principal consultant of Clarity based in Australia. And I’ve written a new book called Step Up or Step Out: How to Deal with Difficult People Even If You Hate Conflict. If you’re anything like me, you probably hate conflict. And I’m excited next week to be on the show to talk about what do you do when you hate conflict, that you have a difficult person, and what if there was a way to help them step up or step out in just four weeks?

Paul Green:
We’re also going to be talking about whether or not you should buy cold data for your MSP. Is it worth you spending that money to get that data? How do you work at best? What are the pitfalls? We’ll explore all of that next week. And we’re going to talk about making sure that your business goals are in alignment with your life vision. Didn’t I sound like a corporate coach using the word alignment? But it’s a big deal, what’s the point of having massive business goals if achieving them doesn’t fit in with the vision that you’ve got for your life. I’ve got a great case study to tell you about, and I’ll do that in next week’s show. Have a great week in business. I’ll see you then.

Voiceover:
Made in the UK for MSPs around the world, Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

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