Episode 149: Claim your share of this $5,000 MSP giveaway

Episode 149: Claim your share of this $5,000 MSP giveaway

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Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Episode 149: Claim your share of this $5,000 MSP giveaway
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Episode 149 includes:

  • 00:00 Create amazing marketing with these 3 influential weapons
  • 09:20 Find out about the $5,000 MSP giveaway
  • 12:45 MSP failure advice from the MSP Podcast Crossover
  • 14:40 What is ‘scrappy marketing’ and how you can use it
  • 27:49 A great book recommendation all about knowing your audience

Featured guests:

Adam Walter shares his business advice on Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast

As part of this month’s Ultimate MSP podcast crossover event, thank you to Adam Walter, co-host of The Humanize IT Podcast, for joining Paul to share the best piece of business advice he’s ever been given.

In each episode of their show, hosts Adam Walter, Skip Ziegler and other industry experts, show business owners, technology professionals and problem-solvers how to excel their careers with a new, more conversation-based approach to IT.

Find out more about this September’s Ultimate MSP podcast crossover event, including the $1000 prize:
https://www.paulgreensmspmarketing.com/MSPpodcastcrossover

Check out the Humanize IT Podcast:
https://anchor.fm/humanize-it

Connect with Adam on LinkedIn:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/adamswalter/

Colt Briner is a featured guest on Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast

Thank you to Colt Briner from Scrappy AF Marketing for joining Paul to discuss how smart marketing on a low budget can have huge impact.

Colt helps mid-stage organisations apply creativity and strategy to capture market share from industry incumbents and build pathways into new markets. Colt combines rich strategy with deeply practical application – and a bit of humour – to ensure his listeners come away equipped to succeed as better marketers and better leaders.

Connect with Colt on LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/colt-briner

Extra show notes:

Episode transcription

Voiceover:
Fresh, every Tuesday, for MSPs around the world, around the world, this is Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast, podcast.

Paul Green:
Hello, superstar. Welcome back to the show. Here’s what we’ve got coming up for you this week.

Colt Briner:
Talk about strong strategies and creative execution to capture market share from industry incumbents if you’re a small starting business.

Paul Green:
That’s Colt Briner. He’s a lovely guy, and he’s going to be talking later on in the show about how you can steal market share from the big incumbent MSPs in your marketplace.

Paul Green:
We’re also talking this week about cash. There’s a big cash giveaway. $5,000 is being given away in total, and you can claim your share of it. I’ll tell you how in a few minutes time.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
One of the best business books that I’ve ever read is a fusion of two of my favourite subjects. You’ve got a bit of marketing in it, and you’ve got a lot of psychology in it. And those two things going together made for an absolutely cracking book. The book is called Influence, by Dr. Robert Cialdini, who is a psychology professor, but who specialises in marketing. And he wrote this book, I think it was mid-80s when he wrote it, and it’s quite a dry read. I think if you are really into your hardcore marketing, you’ll enjoy it a great deal. I would definitely start with it on Audible and have a listen to it.

Paul Green:
You may find it’s a little bit too dry for you if you only have a sort of small interest in marketing and it’s not your passion as it is for me. But, I try and reread this book every year. There’s always, every time I read it, there’s something in it, something that I’ve perhaps learnt before and forgotten and it’s just a good reminder. In fact, I’m going to start rereading it tonight. This can be one of my autumn reads, my fall reads.

Paul Green:
What I’m going to do this week is I’m going to take you through three of the core principles in this book, so three weapons of influence. And then next week on next week’s podcast, I’m going to take you through the other three. Because in this book, Cialdini gives you six weapons of influence. Now because this book has been around for, what’s coming up to, I guess, 40 odd years, because of that, you will have heard of a lot of these before. But just because you’re hearing about something again and again and again, it doesn’t mean that it has less value. In fact, if anything, it’s the other way around. It has greater value if you keep hearing about it again and again.

Paul Green:
And the first weapon of influence that I want to focus on that’s in this book is called social proof. Now we’ve talked about social proof a great deal in this podcast. We’ve talked about testimonials, reviews, case studies. Social proof works because, at a deep psychological level, people are motivated, very highly motivated, to do what most other people are doing. And this goes back to when we all lived in caves and we were in the middle of the food chain. So back then, there really was safety in numbers. If you lived with 50 other people in your tribe, in a cave somewhere, and those 50 people started running, you didn’t stop to think about it and to ask, “Hey, what’s everyone running for?” You just ran with them. It was a bit like being a sheep. You just did it. And you didn’t stop to think about it, it was basic programming that’s within you.

Paul Green:
Now these days, we have social proof, which is our attempt to sort of hook into that. So, when you see a case study, in fact, this is why you need a case study, when you put out a case study of someone who’s used your MSP and they had a problem, and it was a nightmare of a problem, and you solved that problem for them and you made their situation better, and you just smoothed the path for them to greater growth or some of the kind of happy ending, you’re demonstrating social proof in action.

Paul Green:
And, people are heavily influenced by other people they perceive to be like them, which is why you want social proof from business owners and managers. If you’re in a niche, you’re in a niche or a vertical, then you want social proof from within that vertical. For example, I have about 65 reviews on Google, and they’re all from MSPs, because I only work with MSPs. Kind of makes sense, doesn’t it really? So that’s your first weapon of influence.

Paul Green:
Now your second weapon is something called reciprocity. It took me ages to learn how to say that word properly, reciprocity, and I can roll my Rs as well. So reciprocity is, when we are given something, it sets up a need, not a want, but a need to reciprocate, to give something back. This is why, if you were pushing consumer goods, you would offer free samples. If you go to the food store, to the supermarkets, what do you see? You see free samples of stuff. That reciprocity really does work. When you give someone something, it sets up that need to give it back. It’s like a favour.

Paul Green:
This week, as I’m recording this, it’s the school holidays here in the UK. And this week, my daughter’s been at a stage school, learning how to act and stuff. And on Wednesday, I had meetings and other stuff and I just couldn’t take her in. One of the other parents very, very thankfully jumped to help me. And, she sort of had her at her house early in the morning, and then I had her at her house afterwards. And I have this massive reciprocity now that’s been set up in my head that I need to do a favour for that parent now. Does that make sense? So, the other parent hasn’t asked for the favour, and probably never will, but at the back of my head, I have to do something to help that parent, just because they helped me out of a difficult situation. That’s reciprocity in action.

Paul Green:
How would you use reciprocity? Well, there are lots of different ways. If we think about an old marketing tactic that used to be used by MSPs years ago, which is the free audit, hooking someone in and doing a free audit of their business, maybe there’s a level of reciprocity in action with a free audit. I mean, these days, you do a dark web scan or something like that. That would be a clever way to do it. And there are, of course, lots of great places to go and get those dark web scans done now. But yeah, that might be a way of leveraging that kind of reciprocity.

Paul Green:
The third weapon of influence that I want to talk to you about today is commitment and consistency. So this is, again, is down, all of this is down to the basics of how we are driven. When we commit ourselves to something, and we do that in front of other people, we tend to be quite consistent in that behaviour. So I’ll give you an example. Let’s say you want to get fit, and you go and join a gym. And the chances are high that if you just join a gym on your own, you will do what millions and millions of people have done, and will do in the future, which is you join a gym. You go on day one all fired up. You go on day two, a little less fired up. Day three, yeah, not quite as fired up. Day four, you don’t go, but you keep the membership for another year, even though you don’t go to the gym. Now that’s what happens to people when they go on their own.

Paul Green:
When someone goes and they have a PT, a personal trainer, or better still, a friend of theirs who goes to the gym with them, both of those people tend to go and train longer. And, their desire to train has tailored off at the same it would if you were just going solo. But what you don’t want to do is you don’t want to be seen to be inconsistent to your friend. It’s crazy, really. You’ve got two people, neither of whom really wants to go to the gym, but they’re going, not to let the other person down. Isn’t that crazy? But you can actually leverage that.

Paul Green:
So, in terms of your marketing, how would you leverage commitments and consistency? Well, I think here, it’s for existing clients. So when you are doing your QBRs, your quarterly business reviews, or, as I prefer to call them, your strategic reviews, I think, getting someone to sign off a future plan, almost like a roadmap, I think roadmaps can be an important and critical part of a strategic review. And actually sitting with your clients and talking about, asking them about their technology, their growth plans, what’s going to be happening in the next two to three years, that’s a smart thing to do. Put together a roadmap and get them to sign that roadmap. Why do we ask them to sign something? Because someone signing something is psychologically them committing themselves to that. So they are then… No, there’s no actual commitment. No one’s going to hold them to that roadmap. But mentally, emotionally, at a psychological level, they are committing themselves to that roadmap, and they are going to want to be consistent with that commitment.

Paul Green:
And, that means that they are essentially, they’re not just really signing a roadmap, are they? They are signing a pledge to stay with your MSP for the next two to three years. In fact, I believe you use strategic reviews to stop clients ever leaving. They might not have signed the new contract with you yet, but if emotionally, mentally and psychologically, they have committed for another two to three years, they’re not going anywhere.

Paul Green:
So next week, we will do the three more weapons of influence. If you get a chance, do go and get this book off Audible. It’s called Influence, by Robert Cialdini. It’s worth the Audible credit that you’ll spend on it. And I think, as I said, you’ll find some fascinating things inside that book.

Voiceover:
Here’s this week’s clever idea.

Paul Green:
It’s not so much a clever idea today as a clever way for you to take your share of a $5,000 giveaway. That’s what we’re attempting to do this week, across all of my channels, this podcast, YouTube, my email list, my Facebook group and LinkedIn. I am pushing this and pushing this. It’s going to take you 10 to 15 minutes of work. That’s all. And that 10 to 15 minutes is going to earn you up to $45. And the best bit is, in earning that $45, you’re actually helping other MSPs. Let me explain what’s going on, and tell you how you can get your share of this $5,000 giveaway.

Paul Green:
So right at the beginning of this year, I had two wonderful guests on the show. It was Matt Solomon and Kevin Lancaster. And they’d launched a brand new thing. It was called Channel Program. You may be aware of it. It’s been growing at some pace this year, really getting onto quite a lot of people’s radars. If you haven’t checked it out yet, just go and Google Channel Program. And for those of you not in the US, it’s Program with one M. So, here in the UK, we spell program with two Ms and an E. Obviously, we’re doing it wrong here. It’s just the one M. So go and Google Channel Program. They launched that in January.

Paul Green:
And, a couple of weeks ago, they launched a reviews platform as part of that. So they’ve got all the big vendors on there. In fact, there are tons of vendors. We are on there with the MSP Marketing Edge. And, what Matt and Kevin are looking to do now is to build up a huge bank of independent, unbiased reviews about the vendors. So obviously, they just want ordinary MSPs like you to go in and leave reviews about products that they are using. We’ve already got a small number of reviews for the MSP Marketing Edge, which is wonderful, and thank you very much to my members that have left those reviews.

Paul Green:
But this is where the cash comes in. Because right now, they are rewarding MSPs with $15. I think it is as an Amazon gift card. So you get $15 to spend on Amazon, for every review that you leave. To a maximum of three reviews. Otherwise, I guess you could claim the entire $5,000 yourself. But, what we are doing this week is I’m helping Matt and Kevin to get more of those reviews. They’ve given me a budget of $5,000 to give away. So you won’t get the money from me. The money will come from them. But all you have to do is leave a review. So let me tell you how to do it.

Paul Green:
You simply go and register yourself a free account at Channel Program, so it’s channelprogram.com, and then you go to /products. Channelprogram.com/products, that’s where you search for… Basically, go and search for your stack. So take your top three favourite parts of your stack, or your top three favourite vendors. Go and look for them in Channel Program, and then go and leave them an independent review. And once you’ve done those reviews, as I say, you’ll get those $15 gift cards to spend. Three reviews maximum, $45 for you to spend. And we are trying to give away that $5,000 across this week. Tell your friends. I was going to say tell your mom, but actually, it doesn’t really affect your mom, does it, unless your mom runs an MSP. So if your mom runs an MSP, tell your mom. Otherwise, get yourself to channelprogram.com/products, write a review and get some free cash in your pocket.

Voiceover:
The ultimate MSP podcast crossover.

Paul Green:
Just before we get to this week’s big interview, we’ve got something a little bit different for you. September is such an important month for growing your business, because people come back from their summer vacations, their holidays, and they kind of get their head down and plow on with doing as much as they can to grow their business throughout the next few months before we get to the Christmas break. Now the ordinary business owners and managers that you want to reach, they’re doing that right now, which makes it a great opportunity for you to reach out to them, because this is the point they’re starting to make their big plans and implement them.

Paul Green:
So I’ve got together with a bunch of other great MSP podcasters around the world, and together, we are sharing our knowledge, our best ideas throughout September. Today, it’s Adam Walter.

Adam Walter:
Hi, my name is Adam Walter, and I’m the host of the Humanize IT podcast.

Adam Walter:
I’m celebrating the ultimate MSP crossover all through September. And here’s the best piece of business advice I’ve ever been given. Fail fast. Too often, we hold on to projects, teams and ideas too long, because we think, through sheer force of will, we can make them succeed. If we just work a little harder, if we just push a little harder, we’ll get there. Instead, accept the failure. Accept the fact that it didn’t work. And then continuously improve. Make what you’re doing today look like crap tomorrow. So that over time, your business will evolve. Your ideas will evolve. Your teams will evolve. And you will become a best in class business, rather than being stuck on an idea that’s not working.

Adam Walter:
I’ll be back on the Ultimate MSP Crossover Show on September 30th. Remember, you can win a thousand dollars by posting about a crossover on LinkedIn. Use the #MSPpodcastcrossover to enter the draw. We’ll see you there.

Voiceover:
The big, big interview.

Colt Briner:
Hi, I’m Colt Briner with Scrappy AF. I’ve been helping small and mid stage startup companies grow into their markets, with creative execution of proven strategies.

Paul Green:
And, I particularly wanted to get you onto the show to talk about this concept of scrappy marketing. Can you explain what you mean by scrappy marketing? What does that actually mean?

Colt Briner:
Sure. Well, as I have been involved with helping early stage companies capture market share from industry incumbents, generally, they don’t provide me with a budget. So, I’ve had to figure out how to get that done with very few resources. And, that’s allowed me to really create a list of tactics and executables that can be done for very little money. So you add a lot of creativity and super strong strategy, in order to actually achieve capturing market share from deep-pocketed industry incumbents. So that’s the technique of Scrappy.

Paul Green:
So it’s almost a similar thing to bootstrapping, which of course is a phrase which has been around for many years.

Colt Briner:
Definitely. Yeah, you could certainly call it bootstrapping, the bootstrapping version of marketing. It involves a lot of personality. It involves kind of guerilla tactics, in places like conferences and things like that, to create a lot of visibility for a brand, even without spending much money.

Paul Green:
Yeah. Impressive. Okay. Well, we’re going to come onto some scrappy marketing strategies and tactics later on. Let’s, first of all, rewind a little bit. Tell us a bit about you, Colt. Where have you come from? What’s in your background? What allows you to be an expert on our podcast today?

Colt Briner:
Right on. Well, I appreciate you asking. So, I did start my executive career about 20 years ago with my own startup called Coltronix, which I based on a product which I invented and had manufactured out of China. Before that, I had performed, moonlighted as a professional magician, which helped me kind of get comfortable in front of audiences and engaging people in interesting ideas. And then I started into my professional career being employed. I’ve been in video streaming technology. I’ve been in education technology. I’ve been in analytics and machine learning and robotic process automation. And now, most recently, my last gig as chief marketing officer was for a company in healthcare, specifically the healthcare back office, which is, in the US health system, quite a mess.

Paul Green:
Yes. Yes. I can imagine. And, just jumping back to Coltronix, because obviously that’s named after you.

Colt Briner:
Yeah.

Paul Green:
I’d imagine it was. And what was the product that you invented?

Colt Briner:
Well, this was just a novelty product. It was one of the first battery-powered light sticks that you could use for camping or partying or emergency use, that type of thing. The glow stick, with the chemical stick, you crack it and use it. You could only use it once. But a battery-powered version, you could use many, many times.

Paul Green:
So cool. And how many thousands of those, or millions of those, did you sell across the globe?

Colt Briner:
We got up to about 20,000 units a month. And then I think that the ultimate sign that you’re making progress is that somebody knocks you off. I did spot my product in the Oriental Trading Company catalog, which is when I decided, well, that was fun.

Paul Green:
Yeah. Once it started being copied in China, you’ve got no chance, really, have you?

Colt Briner:
That’s right.

Paul Green:
So, let’s return back to this scrappy marketing. In fact, as we’ve been talking, I’ve remembered the musical Hamilton, which I’m sure you’ve seen, it’s-

Colt Briner:
Yeah. Totally great.

Paul Green:
Disney+. Yeah. Yeah, it is. It’s an amazing, I’ve seen it in London. In fact, we’re going to go and see it in Broadway at Christmas time, when we visit the US. But, it was on Disney+ during the pandemic. And my child and I must have watched it perhaps 50 times. And I remember a lyric from one of the songs, Hamilton singing, what was it? It was, “Just like my country, I’m young, scrappy and hungry,” which I think was probably the first time, certainly here in the UK, that we’d really heard that expression of scrappy.

Paul Green:
So, when we’re talking about scrappy marketing, and you were saying it’s more personality-based and it’s about not spending money, and I know a lot of my listeners, a lot of MSPs are going to be listening to this thinking, “I like the idea of not spending money.” What kind of strategies work well for those kind of complicated B2B sales that MSPs have?

Colt Briner:
Yeah, totally. So, I’ll give you some kind of examples of principles that we’re going to use. So, if you’re trying to get to a conference, I mean, it can cost $50,000 to exhibit at a conference, right? And what you see is, is business teams, they’ll come out and they’ll pay for their booths and they’ll wait for people to walk by and that type of thing. If I’m going to take a team to a conference, it might not even get a booth. What I’m going to do is, I’m going to make sure that they stand out with really bold shoes, and I mean expensive, nice shoes, the kind of shoes people will go, “Oh, those really nice shoes.” That starts a conversation.

Colt Briner:
Or, I actually have a team where we worked with The Lapel Project. I don’t know if you know Lapel Project. They have really cool adhesive applications that go onto your existing sports coat, and then make the lapel really pop. And if you’ve got five or six people walking around a conference with something like a really cool hat, some kind of a treatment on the lapel, something like that, bold tie or whatever it is that matches them together, what will happen is that, they’ll create a sense of visibility at the conference that can’t be outperformed by somebody who’s paying for a booth, because your people are sitting in the sessions. They’re walking in the halls. It’s like, “Well, who are these people with the cool hats or the cool shirts or the cool whatever it is?”

Colt Briner:
And that’s just a very affordable way to create visibility for your team at a conference, where everybody else is just wearing basic suits. I mean, that creates no visibility. I had a team do bunny slippers at a conference once, and of course that starts conversations, right?

Paul Green:
Yes. Yes, it does. Yes. So, essentially, it’s about thinking, I hate to use this, it’s such a cliche, but thinking outside the box and saying, “If everyone is doing A, what’s the B, C or D that we could do differently to them?”

Colt Briner:
Yeah. And it’s like, sometimes you’ll have people who aren’t necessarily excited about wearing bunny slippers to the event, but once they see how much attention and visibility and conversations that starts, because that’s the point, right? You’re at a conference to start conversations. You want to, whether it’s about your product or not, if you’ve got an entree into the discussion, “Hey, I like your shoes. I like your jacket,” whatever you do, if you’re good at sales, you can take that starting point and roll with it.

Paul Green:
Yeah. That makes perfect sense. There’s a great book I’ve just finished listening to on Audible. It’s called The Founders. It’s about the creators of PayPal. Of course, Elon Musk was one of those. Peter Thiel, there were a number of people involved in PayPal. And, there was a point where, and I’m probably mixing up parts of the story now, but there was a point where PayPal went to an eBay conference. And, they somehow managed to get the vast majority of the audience in this big panel discussion wearing these PayPal tshirts. So as the eBay executives were looking out at the audience that…

Paul Green:
They had paid for this conference, and they had paid for this audience, there is a sea of PayPal logos. And this was before eBay bought PayPal to be its payment system. And at the time, PayPal and eBay were in a bit of a war as to which payment system would win on eBay. I mean, that’s a great example, I think, of a scrappy solution. Because that cost PayPal, I don’t know, a hundred t-shirts, whereas, of course, eBay had paid X hundred thousand dollars, X million dollars to actually put on that conference in the first place.

Paul Green:
Realistically, for small businesses, because it’s always fun to see big business examples like that. Realistically, for small businesses, what are some of the practical things that you can actually do to stand out, such as you said bunny slippers? What are some everyday things that you can do?

Colt Briner:
Personality in your videos is probably the number one that I find. As companies get larger, they have to become much more risk averse. Smaller companies can express a personality. I mean, some really good examples would be like the Dollar Shave Company. When they got started, the commercial that they put out, really, really great, a lot of personality. They put a little bit of language in there. But, people connected with it. It was like, “I like this guy, and I want to buy razors from this guy because that’s a personality that I resonate with.”

Colt Briner:
Same thing with Dr. Squatch soap company, Poo-Pourri, these are some commercial campaigns that had a lot of personality and took risks that large companies can’t take, because they were either playing on some humor angles or what it might be, that just conservative large companies can’t do.

Colt Briner:
So, take advantage of the risk profile that you can, as a small company, that big players just can’t compete with. That’s an advantage that they don’t want you taking on them, but you really can, if you decide, “This is what I’m out to express. This is who I am.” Go for it. Put some personality in your marketing, your photos, your videos, your copy, that type of thing, and give somebody something to connect with.

Paul Green:
But what would you say to the timid business owner who has heard that advice and thinks, “Yeah, yeah, that’s all very well, but I don’t see other people doing that. I don’t want to put myself out too much out there.” What’s your advice to them in terms of showing there’s nothing for them to lose?

Colt Briner:
I would say, well, let’s first look at the numbers. I mean, if you look at the campaign success for some of the examples that I just listed, I mean, the numbers speak for themselves. The video views alone on each one of those videos, it’s in the tens of millions. So, I think that those numbers should be convincing.

Colt Briner:
And then if you think about, maybe you don’t want to be edgy, but rather you’d like to put some passion behind communicating purpose, that can be another way to go. And campaigns like Nike’s Dream Crazy, the Always Campaign for… A Girl Campaign and Dove’s Choose Beautiful Campaign, again, the numbers absolutely speak for themselves on the results of those campaigns. So whether you want to be bold in communicating personality, or bold in talking about the impact that you want to have on the world, step into it because the numbers will validate you.

Paul Green:
Yeah. So give me an example of some of the best things that either you’ve done with your clients, or that you’ve seen in your research over the years.

Colt Briner:
Sure. One of the strongest results that we got working with Ensemble Health Partners was going, like I said, with purpose-driven, to really express the impact that that organisation is trying to have on the world. And, for these guys, these guys worked in the back office of healthcare, as I mentioned. That’s a kind of messy space in the US, and hospitals need help in that space. So, what Ensemble did was they communicated that they were out to support these healthcare providers in bringing better health and care to the communities that they were supporting, to step out boldly and say, “The impact that we’re trying to have is better health for people’s lives.”

Colt Briner:
And, during the course of that run, we saw a great success, which included growing the company from $60 million to $2 billion in valuation.

Paul Green:
Whoa.

Colt Briner:
And during the two-year kind of peak of that campaign, Ensemble was securing 60% of the contracts that were being written in their industry. I mean, that’s an incredible market share.

Paul Green:
That’s enormous. That’s just phenomenal. But that was a bigger business. It must have been difficult for you to get that business to buy into your methodology, your idea of doing it differently, rather than just going and hiring a mainstream marketing agency.

Colt Briner:
It’s a good point. One of the things that we found though, it became evident that we needed to do something like this, because of the circumstance that Ensemble was in. Their employees were working in cubicles, hundreds or thousands of miles aways from the hospitals and clinics that they were supporting. So they didn’t have really any visibility in terms of, “How does my work as a biller or a coder or a collector lead to a better health in the life of a father, a daughter, a son, a mother?” They didn’t see that at all.

Colt Briner:
So, we undertook this campaign to create visibility, both internally and externally. Because, when people understood the value of their work, they were more committed to the company. They brought in better ideas and committed better effort. They spoke better about the company. I mean, everything about employee engagement went up, as everything about customer engagement went up. So, it was really a win-win.

Paul Green:
Yeah. Yeah, that sounds amazing. Colt, give us a brief overview of what you do to help business owners with their marketing, and then tell us how we can get in touch with you.

Colt Briner:
Sure. I appreciate you asking that. So, I generally engage companies in two different ways. One is, you either got a burning platform. You don’t have any solution overview video, or you’re about to go to a conference, you need a strategy, and we’ll just solve one specific problem. The other is, we’ll take a look at the revenue goals that you have over the next year, and I’ll build a roadmap for you to achieve that in terms of generating leads that can turn into opportunities that turn into revenue.

Colt Briner:
Easy to reach me on LinkedIn, Colt Briner. I’m the only Colt Briner on LinkedIn that I found. Or you can find me at scrappyafsolutions.com.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Voiceover:
This week’s recommended book.

Mike Barrett:
Hi, my name’s Mike Barrett with Barrett & Associates. And, a book that had a big impact on how I think about business is called Rise and Grind by Daymond John. You may know him from Shark Tank. But what you may not know is how he started his business, creating street wear and selling it out of the back of his car. And, his journey to how he got to where he is now just fascinated me, about how he knows his audience, to the point where the first thing he created generated a cultural storm in street wear. And, that’s just an example of how you know the people you want to serve. I would recommend Daymond John and his collection of books to anybody.

Voiceover:
Coming up, coming up next week.

Stuart Holtby:
Hi, I’m Stuart Holtby, and I’m from GetInSync. And, we’ll be here next week and talking about how you can take your vCIO practice up a notch and make more money.

Paul Green:
Subscribe wherever you listen to this podcast so you never miss an episode. Because also next week, I’ve got an idea for you, something that’s going to buy you an enormous amount of goodwill with your team, and actually help them as well. And, it’s all to do with the cost of living and the crisis and inflation and rising prices and all of that kind of stuff. Don’t worry. There’ll be nothing negative next week. We don’t do negative on this podcast. It’s a positive idea, and it’s not going to cost you a lot of money either. It will cost you a little bit if you choose to do it. But I’ll tell you all about that idea next week.

Paul Green:
Plus, of course, we’ve got three more weapons of influence from the book Influence by Robert Cialdini. Now we have a ton of content over at youtube.com/mspmarketing. We’re adding two or three new videos a week. And you can even watch this podcast on YouTube if you want to. It’s staying on all of the audio, any platforms, that you also get to see my lovely mug on YouTube while I’m actually presenting the podcast, if you so choose. Join me next Tuesday, and have a very profitable week in your MSP.

Voiceover:
Made in the UK, for MSPs around the world, Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

 

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