Episode 120: Your MSP’s one page marketing plan

Episode 120: Your MSP’s one page marketing plan

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Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Episode 120: Your MSP’s one page marketing plan
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In this week’s episode

  • To attract new clients you must understand who they are and what they really want. This week Paul tells how this information fits into your one page marketing plan
  • Have you ever done some marketing that just didn’t work? Paul explains the Marketing Triangle, and how it’s a test to make sure all your marketing basics are correct
  • Plus listen for a phishing expert’s advice on how to best sell cyber security solutions

Featured guest

Miles Walker is a featured guest on Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast

Thank you to Miles Walker from Graphus.ai for joining Paul to talk about how to sell more phishing protection to your clients.

Miles Walker is the Channel Development Manager of Graphus.ai, one of Kaseya’s newest acquisitions. Miles joined the Graphus team in 2020 after 15 years in Sales/Marketing and Account Management in London and Toronto. He is now based in Vancouver where his professional career started in Radio @ 104.9 XFM after studying Marketing/Sales and International Business at Capilano University. When Miles is not playing basketball, travelling, sailing or collecting street art he is evangelising all things cyber security through his LinkedIn videos, events and of course virtually!

Show notes

  • Out every Tuesday on your favourite podcast platform
  • Presented by Paul Green, an MSP marketing expert
  • Find out more about Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Edge
  • Paul mentioned the new email solution from the makers of Basecamp called Hey.com
  • Thank you to filmmaker Jude Charles for recommending the book Principles by Ray Dalio
  • In next week’s episode on March 8th, Paul will be joined by Rob Jolliffe, President of Sabre Limited and MicroAge Kitchener, to talk about why MSPs should add Microsoft Dynamics to their portfolio
  • Got a question from the show? Email Paul directly: hello@paulgreensmspmarketing.com

Episode transcription

Voiceover:
Fresh every Tuesday for MSPs around the world. This is Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
Pinch punch, first of the month, and welcome to March. Here’s what we got coming up for you on this week’s show.

Miles Walker:
No golf club or private school wants the whole city to know that they’ve had a breach, because people won’t want to go there.

Paul Green:
That’s Miles Walker from Graphus. He’s going to be here later on in the show talking about the latest phishing trends and how you can sell more phishing protection to your existing clients. Plus, we’re going to pick up something that we started in last week’s show. It’s putting together a one-page marketing plan for your MSP, so that you know exactly what to do to get more new clients.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
We keep a fairly extensive log of everything that I’ve talked about in this podcast. A, so I don’t repeat myself too often, but B, so I can make sure I’m constantly finding new and exciting things to talk to you about. And I can’t believe, and believe me, I’ve searched the log for this, but I can’t believe that we’ve got to episode 120 of this podcast and I’ve never mentioned the marketing triangle. I mean maybe I’ve mentioned it in passing somewhere, but I’ve never done it as a bit, which I’m now going to do.

Paul Green:
So, what is the marketing triangle? Well, it is the ultimate test. And in fact, it’s the way of finding out why a piece of marketing has worked, or more importantly, why a piece of marketing hasn’t worked. The marketing triangle is one of the simplest, simplest concepts in marketing. And when you understand it, you can judge all of your marketing by it.

Paul Green:
Now before I tell you about the marketing triangle, let me first of all tell you about the fire triangle. If we go back to mid to late 1980s, and there was me as a youngster, how old would I have been? About 1988, I’d have been about 14 I guess, and I was my Fire Badge in the Scouts. I did 10 years in Cubs and Scouts and Ventures, loved it. And when I was doing my Fire Badge, I had a bit of an unfair advantage, I had a secret weapon in my dad because my dad was a fireman. In fact, he went on to put out the Windsor Castle fire back in 1992, the Queen’s primary home, Windsor Castle here in the UK had a massive fire and parts of it were destroyed and my dad was actually in charge of that fire when the fire was put out, and went on to get a medal from the Queen, which was really cool.

Paul Green:
Anyway, back in Scouting days, I was doing my Fire Badge and my dad was teaching me the very basics of fire fighting. When it comes to putting out a fire, you need to understand that any fire, to be viable, has to have three distinct elements. Those three distinct elements are fuel, heat, and oxygen. So when you’re fighting a fire, all you need to do is remove one of those elements. And suddenly the fire triangle is no longer viable. So the triangle will collapse in on itself, or put it another way, the fire will go out. This is why firefighters use water, lots of water, they’re trying to reduce the heat of the fire so the fire goes out. Or they’ll put foam on it because they’re trying to smother it and remove oxygen, putting the fire out.

Paul Green:
Or for example, if there’s a building on fire and there’s something near to that building, they will often collapse that thing, I mean this is a fairly extreme firefighting tactic these days, but back in the old days they would knock down a house to create a gap, thereby so it wouldn’t burn other houses in the street. I’m talking back a couple of hundred years ago, but they would do that to remove fuel. So you remove either oxygen or heat or fuel and the fire is no longer viable.

Paul Green:
Now I tell you this because everyone can understand the basics of the fire triangle. And actually, the marketing triangle is very similar in that you’ve got three elements, and if you don’t have all three elements, the marketing triangle will collapse in on itself and it will not be viable. Now the three elements of the marketing triangle are message, market, medium. If you Google that, you’ll see some times that that’s called media. I prefer to use the word medium. When you say media, people start to think about newspapers and radio and stuff like that. So you’ve got message, market, medium. You’ve got to get the right message to the right market using the right medium.

Paul Green:
That’s the basics of the marketing triangle, because in that you can assess every piece of your marketing to find out why it works or why it doesn’t work. Anytime an MSP says to me, “Oh Paul, I tried this,” whatever this is, “and it didn’t work for me.” It didn’t work and I will just look straight away at those three basics, what was the message you were sending out? What was the market you were sending it to? And what was the medium that you were using? Let’s say your message is about cybersecurity and protecting your business. That’s a good message. Let’s say the market you are sending it to is decision makers, so business owners and managers, you want to target, that’s a great message going to a great market. And then you put it on TikTok, the social media platform that’s used by 11 year olds.

Paul Green:
Well, there aren’t many business owners, I’m sure there are a few, but not many. It’s not a primary marketing channel for B2B marketing, so you’ve got the right message, you’ve got the right market, but you’ve got the wrong medium. TikTok is not the right medium, whereas LinkedIn or email or something like that would be a better medium. Now, that’s an extreme example, but it really does answer the basics of why some marketing works and why other marketing doesn’t work. It’s a key thing to be able to put yourself in the mind of the person that you want to reach and to ask yourself from their point of view, is this a relevant message? Are they the right kind of people that buy what it is you sell, the services that you sell? And are you reaching them using the correct mediums, the correct channels to reach people? If you can judge all of your marketing by the marketing triangle, it’s just a basic check, but it will stop you making some very potentially expensive mistakes right from the get go.

Voiceover:
Here’s this week’s clever idea.

Paul Green:
Talking about the marketing triangle leads very nicely into your one-page marketing plan. So this is something we’re doing as a series across several episodes of the podcast. Last week, we got started by helping you to understand your market and the competitors that you are against.

Paul Green:
Now, the next part of this is to understand your client, to understand exactly how they think, why they think that way, what they want, and what they need. This starts with knowing exactly who your customers are. And this is a kind of example client that you put together, either in your head, or maybe working with your team, you actually flesh that person out. You might even give them a name, pull up an image from the internet to represent them, and actually flesh out, who is this person? What do they want? Why would they buy from us? This is how you figure out your client and their drivers, the driving factors that will affect their decision to pick your MSP or not pick your MSP.

Paul Green:
I mean imagine having a printout of just a random dude that you found on the internet and you call him Kevin and you decide he’s a 48-year old business owner based 10 miles away from you in your town, this is what he wants. This is what he needs. This is what keeps him up at 4:00 in the morning. This is what he worries about. This is his fear. This is his desire. This is his long-term goal. This is what his other half does. This is what his business partner thinks. This is what his staff think of him. This is the car he wants to drive. This is the house he wants to live in. What’s holding him back? It’s growing his business. How can technology help him to grow his business? It can help him in this way or it can hold him back in this way.

Paul Green:
You could flesh out, based on all the years that you’ve been dealing with these people, because you are an expert in these people, whether you realise it or not. Certainly if you’ve been doing this for a few years, you can flesh all of this stuff out and you can really get inside Kevin’s heart and get inside Kevin’s head, and this is how you understand your client.

Paul Green:
So on your one-page marketing plan, and remember we’re trying to keep this very simple, you might just have a picture of Kevin, a small head and shoulders shot of him, and then perhaps three, four, or five bullet points about what he most wants. And I would concentrate on those main drivers. “What does Kevin want?” is the biggest question to ask. It’s not really about what Kevin needs, it is more about what Kevin wants or what his fears are, because it’s easier to sell something to someone when you’re giving them what they want, what their heart really wants, or you’re taking away their fears.

Paul Green:
If you could do a small number of bullet points on Kevin and his world, that will give you a tremendous advantage on your competitors. Because very few MSPs ever think about this stuff. Very few MSPs actually sit and study their future clients. In fact, if you wanted to take this even further, go read what Kevin reads, go join the associations that Kevin joins. This is particularly powerful if you’re operating in a vertical or a niche or a niche. Go and consume what they consume. Look at what’s happening in their world. I do this, I read all of the technology blogs, not very often, once a week will do it for me, but I keep in touch with what’s happening in your world, all the and things that Microsoft is changing and all the other big vendors are changing, because I’m not a tech and that helps me to keep in touch with the hopes, fears, and desires of the people that I want to do business with, which is of course MSPs.

Paul Green:
You can do exactly the same thing, but from a planning point of view, you just need a few bullet points to help you remember how Kevin thinks, what he wants, what he needs, and what he’s afraid of. Stick these bullet points onto your one-page marketing plan and you’ve taken another important step towards having a useful plan that can guide your marketing going forward.

Paul Green:
Now we’re going to continue this in next week’s episode where we’ll be talking about verticals, how can you pick a niche for your MSP? And should you do it as a side thing? Should you fully commit to it? What’s the best way to do it? We’re going to add that to your one-page marketing plan next week.

Voiceover:
Paul’s blatant plug.

Paul Green:
I mentioned in that last bit that my prospective clients are, of course, MSPs. And I primarily work with people through my MSP Marketing Edge service. I’ll just give you the bullet points on this. If you want new clients but your marketing isn’t good enough, then the MSP Marketing Edge makes your marketing easy. Your first month is free, or a pound if you’re in the UK, just difference because of the payment systems we use, and then it’s either 129 US dollars a month or 99 pounds a month if you’re in the UK, there’s no contract and you can cancel any time. But critically, we only supply it to one MSP per area. This is the biggest thing for us, because it wouldn’t work if we gave it to lots of MSPs in the same area at the same time. So if you go into mspmarketingedge.com, pick either the UK, the US, or the international site and you can put in your post code or your zip code and see whether one of your competitors has beaten you to it or whether or not you can start your month’s free trial. mspmarketingedge.com.

Voiceover:
The big interview.

Miles Walker:
Hello everyone. Miles Walker here. I’m the Channel Development Manager of Graphus. I’ve been with Graphus for just under a year now. Moved over from the travel space, excited to chat with everybody today, of course.

Paul Green:
And thank you so much for coming on this podcast, Miles. Now the back end of last year, you and I did a webinar all about how ordinary people look at cyber security. And the grim reality is, the business owners and managers that MSPs want to reach, they’re just not security aware, are they?

Miles Walker:
No, they’re really not. And that’s the thing. I mean phishing is something that’s going to be affecting all of us. I like to use my terrible cliché that I still use Hotmail. On our Hotmail accounts, if you use it there Paul, they actually have a phishing button now that’s actually embedded into their system. If you don’t really have some type of phishing solution in place, you’re going to have one in the next 12 to 24 months, whether for business or for personal, which is a big thing I always like to tell people.

Paul Green:
I’ve got to be honest, I didn’t know that Hotmail was still a thing. I think I stopped using it around about 2002, something like that. You don’t really actually use it, do you?

Miles Walker:
Well when I tell you my Hotmail address, you’re going to be like, “Okay.” I actually had someone over the phone, I can’t remember who, it was my telecommunications provider or my email provider. She asked for my email and I said, “Yep, it’s whenyouwanttocontactmilescontactmiles@hotmail.com.” And she laughed and she’s like, “Oh, I like that.” And so I’ve always stuck with it for my personal stuff. I definitely have a Gmail account, don’t worry, I’ve got a Yahoo, but yeah, I still use my Hotmail.

Paul Green:
Okay. Have you got yourself a hey.com yet? I think that’s the 2022 version.

Miles Walker:
No, I don’t. I actually don’t know what that is.

Paul Green:
Oh, okay. Okay. Maybe that’s something to go and look up, hey.com. It’s email from the makers of Basecamp, the productivity and collaboration software, but anyway we’re getting off the point here. We’re supposed to be talking about phishing. So ordinary business owners and managers, they’re not aware of phishing, even though it’s all around them. Why? Why are they so unaware of these real dangers that are sitting there in front of them every day?

Miles Walker:
I think people know that cybersecurity is an issue, but I mean a lot of the large companies. So if we’re looking at small, medium, and large-scale businesses, large-scale businesses have known that this has been an issue now for years. That’s something that they’ve always known and they have the money, they have the tools in place, they have the cybersecurity training to make sure that their team, their workers are well prepared.

Miles Walker:
Small and medium-size businesses, basically over the last probably 36 months, have been breached and hit a lot more. So just to give you some facts, 50% of all breaches now are to small and medium-size businesses. And if you look back three years ago, it would’ve been 90% would’ve been large scale. So those small and medium-sized businesses never had to worry, but now it’s tipped the scales. 50% is small and medium-sized businesses. So if they don’t know, they’re hearing a lot more about it these days.

Paul Green:
And yet they don’t take action on it, do they? Even though they’re hearing these stats, in fact, this is what you and I were talking about in this webinar, stats on their own don’t really affect people at an emotional level and you’ve got to affect them emotionally to get them to take action. What you’ve got to do is almost replicate the feeling of they’re being burgled, burglarised. If ever you’re in your street and one of your neighbours gets burgled, suddenly you start to genuinely seriously think about your own home security and it’s the same for these guys when a member of their team or someone they know clicks on a bad link and something bad happens to their business.

Miles Walker:
Really, you do have to know someone firsthand. I know, I have a friend who lives in Melbourne, Australia, and she messaged me about three months ago and she’s like, “My CrossFit gym just got hit by a ransomware attack.” And I said, “Oh my gosh. I’m so sorry to hear.” She’s like, “Can you help?” And I’m like, “No, no, no. We help before, we don’t help after. We’re not the ones who go in and try to negotiate with these cyber terrorists.” And so she was quite upset and she thought that I would be able flick a magic switch and all would be good.

Miles Walker:
I said, “This is happening more and more and this is why small companies need to be looked after,” because the low-hanging fruit, I guess if I want to use the cliché term, is something that people are going after now. So these cyber criminals realise breaking in and breaching a Microsoft or an IBM, you need to have a team of experts, but to breach a mom and pop chippy, because I’m using my British terms here because I haven’t been back in a while, or a local laundromat or a small school, it’s much easier to do than breaking into the big boys’ homes.

Paul Green:
It is. It is. And I’m going to test you on some more Britishisms at the end.

Miles Walker:
All right. Sounds good.

Paul Green:
Because Miles was born in the UK and then moved to Canada when you were, what was it? About six, seven? Something like that?

Miles Walker:
I moved from sunny Padstow, Cornwall via Kilburn to Vancouver, but I’ve spent about a quarter of my life there so I’ve gone back in my 20s.

Paul Green:
Okay. Okay. Well we’ll do some British testing later on.

Miles Walker:
Sounds good.

Paul Green:
So I’ve got two big things I want to ask you. The first thing I want to ask you is an update on other kind of phishing-related scams. So just before our interview, you were telling me about smishing, which I know what that is just because I’ve done some research for that for our MSP Marketing Edge service, but there may be some people listening who haven’t heard of smishing and I’d love to get an update on other trends.

Paul Green:
And then after that, Miles, I want to talk about, how do we leverage all of this information and all of this scarier stuff that’s happening to persuade the people that we’re selling to to make the right decisions, to buy in the right security processes? So start by giving us an update then on trends, things that are happening right now in the security world.

Miles Walker:
Of course, of course. Well smishing is SMS phishing. Obviously cyber criminals are evolving, they’re getting smarter. They’re not just a 16 year old kid in their mum’s basement trying to hack into the local library. They still have that, but it’s much more advanced than that. So smishing is SMS text phishing. And what they’re doing is they know that 98% of people open a text message and only about 15% open an email. So they know the chance of them actually opening that are better. So I mean I probably got five this week, they’re usually bank related. They say, “Hi, your account has been compromised. Click here to reset your password.” And a lot more people do it. And I’ll be honest, a lot more of the elderly crowd will do it, but it’s not just the elderly crowd that is clicking these days. So, that’s one thing that I wanted to go over is smishing. So, that’s happening a lot more.

Paul Green:
And what other kind of scams are people being targeted with right now?

Miles Walker:
Recently, I got hit by an Instagram attack. I was following Hotel Z, and Hotel Z is a local hotel chain here in Western Canada, and they were running a contest. And the contest was for a free pair of customised Converse shoes and a three night stay at any one of their hotels. A lot of the big companies run these campaigns and the chance of you winning with a Hyatt or a Marriott are so slim because they have millions of users, but Hotel Z has 5,000 followers. So the chance of you winning with a small company on one of these campaigns is much easier. So, all you had to do was tag a couple friends and then within 24 hours, I got a congratulations message and it says, “You are the winner,” and what happens next?

Miles Walker:
They send you to the page to book in your nights and they say, “You have 10 minutes to book in your nights.” You had mentioned something earlier about how they operate, these cyber criminals, and they want to act on emotion. So I got the message, I was super excited. Obviously it came through via the direct message platform on Instagram. I got super excited, it had the logo there, it had the name, they had all their followers. I was excited. I clicked on the link. I had 10 minutes to register my prize, or else it would go to somebody else. And I clicked in, put in the dates I wanted, and then of course it asked for a credit card, and coming from the travel industry, you always need a credit card to book a hotel. And at that point I got a little bit wary. So I end up calling the hotel up and said, “Hey, I work in cyber security. I think you’ve been breached or hacked,” and they went and checked and turned out they had been.

Paul Green:
You saved them, and it only cost you $10,000 off your credit card.

Miles Walker:
Yeah, well exactly. And I think the thing that was so crazy is that they managed to grow their followers from a fake account up to 1,000 within about 24 hours. So I guess what they were doing is they were monitoring the Hotel Z account, how they were doing this I’m not sure, and they were monitoring it, they saw all the people. So they went in and actually added all of the followers from the real account. To be honest, people will often accept accounts without really doing their due diligence like I did. And they had 1,000 followers. I don’t remember how many followers they had originally. I was emotional, I was excited, and that’s what these cyber criminals do. They want to act on your emotions because when you’re emotional, you tend to do things that you wouldn’t normally do.

Miles Walker:
I always say to anyone who will listen, “If you get an email from a client or a friend, a partner, a family member and you’re emotional, don’t respond back.” Because often you will respond back with an aggressive tone, you’ll not reply back in your normal mindset if you’re emotional. So I always mention that to people.

Paul Green:
Yes. And never text when you’ve had a beer either. That’s another golden rule, or reply to an email to a client when you’ve had a beer or a few beers-

Miles Walker:
Or five beers. Yeah.

Paul Green:
Oh, definitely never five beers. In fact Google used to do a thing, it was called Beer Goggles Mail, for Google Mail, and basically after a certain time at night, it was a setting you could set where you couldn’t send an email unless you could do the sum that was on the screen within like 10 seconds or something. Their thinking was, if you had had five beers and you thought, “Oh, this is a good idea, I’ll send an email,” it actually delayed your ability to send the email.

Paul Green:
Anyway, look, you and I are distracting each other a lot here. Let’s talk how we leverage this to help people, because we know that the business owners and managers we want to reach, they don’t get this stuff, they’re not really that interested until it does affect them, and yet they should be protected from themselves. Everyone’s targeting them all the time. It’s like they’re leaving their houses open, literally the door’s open, the windows are open with big signs on saying, “The gold’s in the bedroom. The silver’s in the cupboard behind the bed,” or whatever. How do we protect them? Because we know we can’t appeal to their brains. Their brains are making logical buying decisions and they’re just not making the right decisions. Just as the hackers are targeting people’s emotions, so we’ve got to target people’s emotions too. How do we best do this, Miles?

Miles Walker:
I think, like you mentioned earlier, you have to give them practical examples that hit home. I mean I loved your neighbour example. It’s something crazy, like cyber spending goes up 18 times after a breach has occurred. So when a breach occurs at a business, suddenly they open their piggy bank and start realising, “Wow, I need to spend.” I always like to target in on the little guys. So for example, close to home for you, Wentworth Golf Club. That’s just in Surrey, they were hit by a cyber breach recently. Did they steal data? Yes. They actually stole credit cards of the 5,000 members. Then Wentworth decides they want to spend a lot of money on cybersecurity. We have a local casino just down the street from us here. They were hit recently by a cyber breach.

Miles Walker:
And these are examples of small and medium-sized businesses that are not corporations that are just like the businesses that we see around town that have been hit, and that allows people to realise that it could happen to us. And to be honest, a lot of these companies try to keep this stuff out of the media. No golf club or private school wants the whole city to know that they’ve had a breach because people won’t want to go there. So, I mean that’s the kind of thing that I think we need to explain that through examples and whether it’s an MSP getting breached or a smaller, medium-sized business. It has to be something that somebody knows that’s in their community, in their town, or that has a lot of brand recognition and is not one of the big players. Because I could go in depth about the breaches at Yahoo where 3 billion emails got compromised, or the breaches that eBay or Expedia, or closer to home here in North America, the AT&Ts or the Microsofts, but I think bringing it close to home really helps.

Paul Green:
Yes. I think that’s fantastic advice. Thank you very much, Miles. Right before we just talk a little bit about you and what Graphus does to help MSPs, I’m going to have to ask you to give me some British phrases here. I know we never normally do this in the interviews, but I just feel like having some fun with you. So you were born in the UK, moved out to Vancouver, came back to the UK in your 20s. Miles Walker, I want to hear you say, “All right, mate. Do you fancy a cuppa?”

Miles Walker:
All right, mate. Do you fancy a cuppa?

Paul Green:
Yeah. I didn’t say to do it like Dick Vandyke in Mary Poppins, but that’s fine. That’s fine. If you want to do it that way, that’s fine. Okay. Here’s another one.

Miles Walker:
All right, mate. Do you fancy a cuppa?

Paul Green:
That just sounds weird now. Okay. How about, “I haven’t seen that in donkey’s years.”

Miles Walker:
I’ve never been tested. I like this. I haven’t seen that in donkey’s years.

Paul Green:
What accent is that? That’s not British or Canadian.

Miles Walker:
You have to remember, I was from Cornwall. We sound like pirates mixed with a little taste of the Irish.

Paul Green:
That’s very true. That’s very true.

Miles Walker:
I mean I remember I was actually over at my aunt’s house on the weekend and she said my little accent, when I came over from England, I would mix up my Rs and Ws when I was a kid, my name is Miles Walker and I would say it in my little Cornish accent, “Oi, my name’s Miles Rawker.” When I wanted to go for a walk I would say, “I want to go for a rock.” And so the Cornish accent, you know what? It’s very unique. We do have a little bit of our own language, which of course, I don’t know any of.

Paul Green:
Okay. One more. All right. How about, “Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves?”

Miles Walker:
Look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves.

Paul Green:
You did that in the posh Paul Green British accent there. It’s very good. I like that.

Miles Walker:
Well, yeah.

Paul Green:
Thank you for that.

Miles Walker:
I love your accent. My dad’s got his Queen’s English from Plymouth and he was educated in East Africa at posh boarding school. So I like to hear his accent, I like to hear your accent. And I’ve interviewed a few people recently from London and it’s so to hear that East London twang as well.

Paul Green:
I love this. And for those of you listening in Cornwall or Devon, seeing as you mentioned Plymouth, please do right to complaints@paulgreensmspmarketing. I’ll give you the address later on! Miles, tell us a little bit more about the company you work for, Graphus. So what do you guys do to help MSPs protect people who don’t know that they need to be protected?

Miles Walker:
We’re an anti-phishing solution. So we’re cloud based. We work on Office 365 and G-suite platforms. We’re simple, we’re affordable, we’re automated, and we’re great, to be honest. There’s the quick little elevator pitch, but we actually embed ourselves into the email system. So we are an AI-based technology. The nice thing about AI compared to some other solutions, we don’t have to set rules in place. AI doesn’t get distracted by the football matches. They do not get distracted by girlfriends or boyfriends. They don’t have kids running around bothering them. They work when you’re asleep. And so, having that big AI base is a big one.

Miles Walker:
I think most of the companies that are offering anti-phishing solutions out there are moving cloud based and a lot of people are going away from that on-prem secure email gateway systems that have been around for 10 or 12 of years. They just haven’t evolved as much as the new solutions that are in place, basically are in the market I guess you’d say.

Paul Green:
That’s great. Thank you. Thank you so much, Miles. You’ve been very generous with your time, and of course, your British accents as well. Tell us the website address for Graphus.

Miles Walker:
It’s a graphus.ai. Obviously, if anyone wants more information, they can reach out to me and I can put them in touch with the right solutions manager. I don’t actually go through the full onboard training and whatnot, and what I’ll do is I give a 30,000 foot view. I give the generalities of the product and then we have one of our experts actually jump in and talk to MSPs, talk to business owners, and they can actually run you or run one of your clients or MSPs through the whole system, specifically with deploying it to their users in mind. That website, again, was graphus.ai. If you wanted to reach out to me directly, my email is miles.walker@graphus.ai.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast. This week’s recommended book.

Jude Charles:
Hi, my name is Jude Charles and I am a filmmaker that helps entrepreneurs leverage the power of storytelling in their business. Today, I’m recommending the book Principles by Ray Dalio, and it is really an excellent book on leadership and understanding how Ray Dalio was able to build his company, Bridgewater Associates, into a large firm. And it’s really about what his life and work is about, the principles that he lives by, and I really think every entrepreneur should read this book.

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Coming up next week.

Rob Jolliffe:
Hi, I’m Rob Jolliffe, President of Sabre Limited and MicroAge Kitchener. And I’m going to talk about why MSPs should add Microsoft Dynamics to their portfolio on next week’s show.

Paul Green:
We’re also going to be talking about how you bond with clients. What happens to them on day one, week one, month one, and even in their first 90 days when they’ve joined your MSP? Well, that has a direct correlation on their happiness and ultimately, whether or not they’ll be a three or four year client or a 10 or 15 year client. We’re also going to pick up on the work we’ve done in this episode on your one-page marketing plan. We’ll be looking at what your niche is. Now, your niche isn’t necessarily a vertical, but it’s a subset of your audience, and we need to figure out who it is that you’re trying to reach for you to add that to your one-page marketing plan.

Paul Green:
Now I’ve got something new to tell you about this week as well. We have launched another show. In fact, it’s a show about this show. It’s called Another Bite and it happens on YouTube. So every Tuesday when we publish this podcast on all of the podcast platforms, we’ll be publishing Another Bite onto YouTube. So you can see that now. You can either just go into YouTube and search or go to youtube.com/mspmarketing. And you’ll see the first episode there of Another Bite. I’m joined by presenter, Sophie Bruce to talk more about some of the themes that we’ve talked about in this podcast. Please do subscribe to us on YouTube and anywhere else that you listen to this podcast. Join me next Tuesday and have a very profitable week in your MSP.

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Made in the UK for MSPs around the world. Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

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