Episode 108: How MSPs can control the chaos in the business

Episode 108: How MSPs can control the chaos in the business

Paul Green Leave a Comment

Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Paul Green's MSP Marketing Podcast
Episode 108: How MSPs can control the chaos in the business
/

In this week’s episode

  • We know it’s not good, but why do we allow chaos to run riot in our businesses? This week Paul explains how to banish chaos and put your MSP on a new growth path
  • Also on the show this week, the difference between your clients’ “real” and “perceived” problems. How to identify which is which and get to the core of the real problem
  • And this week’s featured guest joins Paul to explain how MSPs can really get the most out of technology roadmaps

Featured guest

Stephen Rosenthal is this week's guest on Paul Green's MPS Marketing Podcast

Thank you to Stephen Rosenthal from Managed Services Platform for joining Paul to talk about how MSPs can best implement technology roadmaps for clients.

Stephen is a multipreneur with ventures in sales, marketing, real estate, and retail. He leads Aurra Media, a scrappy omni-channel marketing team with a special focus on podcast marketing. As a friendly “sales guy”, Stephen genuinely enjoys serving and connecting with people. By day, Stephen builds positive customer experiences. And by night he enjoys hanging with his family and nerding out about NFTs.

Connect with Stephen on email.

Show notes

Episode transcription

Voiceover:
Fresh, every Tuesday, for MSPs around the world, this is Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
Oh my goodness, we are here in December already? This year is going so fast. Here’s what we’ve got coming up for you in this week’s show.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Excited to be a part of the podcast, to help you as an MSP utilise strategic conversations with clients to grow your relationships with them.

Paul Green:
That’s Stephen Rosenthal from Managed Services Platform. He’s going to be here, later on in the show. We’re also going to be talking about when your clients perceive they have problems. One of the first questions to ask yourself is, “Is it a real problem or is it just a perceptual problem? If it’s just a perceptual one, what can we do to eliminate it so they don’t think they’ve got a problem?” I’ll explain exactly what this means and we’ll look at this in detail, later on in the show.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Paul Green:
Let’s start by talking about chaos. By chaos, I mean chaos within your business. Because no matter how well run your MSP, there is some level of chaos within your business. Because the reality is, there’s a level of chaos within every business.

Paul Green:
I’ve been listening to a book recently, an audio book. I highly recommend it, actually. It’s called Power Play. I’ve got it on Audible and it’s about Tesla. It goes right from the point at which a couple of guys had the idea for Tesla, “Let’s build our own electric vehicle.” It was actually built on a Lotus frame, back in the day. Elon Musk was one of the early investors. It goes through him taking control of the business and building it up into the company that we know today. Essentially, at every single point of their history, Tesla was in different states of chaos. It’s a massive company that’s outputting a lot of cars now, and I’m a Tesla fan. I’m sure, to a certain extent, there is chaos within that business even right now. Somewhere in that business, there will be some points of chaos. So all businesses have chaos.

Paul Green:
The key question to ask yourself is what chaos still exists within your business, and who creates that chaos and who allows that chaos to survive. And actually, the answer to both of those questions might be the person who looks back at you in the mirror in the morning. Because my experience of most smaller, owner operated businesses, anything below around about 50, 60, 70 staff or so, is it’s the business owner who both creates the chaos and certainly permits it to survive.

Paul Green:
What is chaos? When I talk about chaos, what do I mean? I mean disorganisation, I mean problems that go on and don’t get fixed. Or, repeat problems. This has got to be the biggest indicator of chaos within a business. If, for example, you have a persistent problem within a business, and you haven’t got a system to recognise that there’s a problem and systemise it away, then that is chaos. And yes, you do need a system to create systems. That sounds a little bit crazy, but it really is that simple. That’s what I mean by chaos.

Paul Green:
Is there chaos in the way that the bills are paid? Is there chaos in the way that tickets are handled? I’ve heard from MSPs who’ve got some tickets that have been open for two, three years or more. That’s a level of chaos. Is there chaos in the way that you register licenses? Is there chaos in your marketing? Where’s the chaos within your business and who does allow it to survive?

Paul Green:
Now as I say, you are likely to create chaos as the owner of the business, perhaps because you are not the most organised person in the world. Or more likely, you’ve set up systems for things but then you don’t follow your own systems. And quite often, you hear that from staff don’t you, that the owner has set out, “Right, this is the way we’re going to do it,” and then the owner is absolutely the first person to break that system.

Paul Green:
You probably create a level of chaos, there’s probably just other areas of the business as well where there is chaos. But, who allows it to survive? That’s got to be you. That one is absolutely in your camp. As the leader of the business, even if it’s just you and three or four other people in the business, if you allow that chaos to survive, it’s on you, it’s your bad.

Paul Green:
There are some things you can do. Many things, in fact. In fact, there are five areas that I believe you need to look at, to remove chaos from a business. Those five areas are this.

Paul Green:
First of all, it’s getting the right staff. You’ve got to have the right people. We all look for A-team players, but sometimes we have to just kick back and accept a B-team player if we can’t find, or can’t attract, or can’t keep that A-teamer. But, having the right staff is so critical to controlling and eliminating the chaos within the business. If you don’t have the right staff, you’ve got to do something about it. If you’re listening to this podcast on a speaker in the office, I’m really sorry but, there is probably a low performer sat listening to this right now. Well, you should be scared for your job.

Paul Green:
That was a little unfair, wasn’t it? That was a cruel thing. But, it’s true. We are far too lenient as business owners, at letting poor performers stay in the business. We’ve all read that you’re supposed to hire slowly and fire fast, and yet, pretty much everyone I know acts in exactly the opposite way. They hire really, really quickly because there’s this desperate, urgent need to get people on board. And then, they fire far too slow. All of us, myself included, all of us tolerate poor performance for way longer than we actually should. So you’ve got to get the right staff to control the chaos.

Paul Green:
The second thing you’ve got to do is make sure that those staff have great goals and targets. They’ve got to know what game they’re playing. What game are we playing here? We’re playing soccer. Or, football as we call it in the UK. And, the goal is to get the ball in the net, over there, on the opposition’s side. That’s what we’re trying to do. It’s easy with football isn’t it, with soccer, because all you literally have got to do is just get the ball past a line, in a net. It’s not that difficult.

Paul Green:
With an MSP, it’s a lot more difficult. But, what are you working towards this year and next year? Are you working towards growing your monthly recurring revenue? Are you working towards increasing your net profit and making sure that your clients are literally as happy as they could be? And, all of those three things, by the way, go hand-in-hand. Happy clients, lots of monthly recurring revenue, good levels of net profit. Your team needs to know what the game is, they need to know how they win the game.

Paul Green:
The third thing they then need are systems. Systems, systems, systems. In other words, SYSTEM, it’s actually an acronym. It stands for saves you stress, time, energy, money. That’s the acronym for the word system. Everything in the business can by systemised. What I typically find with MSPs is the delivery is often very systemised. You’ve got IT Glue or something else, and you’ve got loads of information about clients, and you’ve written down systems for adding new users, and password resets and all of that kind of stuff. But, what about the marketing? What about the admin? What about the way the phone is picked up? What about rules for tickets and making sure that tickets don’t last for two or three years? All of these things need systems.

Paul Green:
And then, all of these systems lead onto number four, which is checklists. There’s a great book you can read by Atul Gawande, it’s called The Checklist Manifesto. It looks at why medicine makes simple mistakes. You can have a really intelligent, highly experienced surgeon who can do a five hour brain operation and get everything right, in the kind of procedure that you simply couldn’t systemise, you couldn’t checklist. And then, they’ll do something crazy like leave a swab inside and that’s what kills the patient. This author, Atul Gawande, who is a doctor and now runs a hospital group in the US, he looked at how aviation had eliminated a whole series of mistakes through some cultural changes and through the use of checklists. If you’re struggling with systemising and check listing in your MSP, I highly recommend that book.

Paul Green:
And then, the fifth factor is the environment that people are in, the environmental factors. I don’t really mean how nice is your office, I mean what kind of an environment do they work within. Do you permit an environment where, when the annoying client calls up, because we’ve all got annoying clients, everyone … When the annoying client calls up, do you permit your staff to sit, and whinge and moan about them for 10 minutes or so? When a client does something stupid, which again, clients do, do you have an environment where you permit your staff to talk about it and to talk about, “Oh, how stupid the client is?” Because to me, that’s not a great environment for eliminating chaos.

Paul Green:
Do you have an environment where people are encouraged to spot something wrong and to flag it up to your attention? And actually, even if they’re wrong, that that’s a great thing to do. A great example from that book Power Play, the Tesla one I was telling you about, the factory that they’ve got in Fremont, in California, it used to belong to Toyota. Back when Toyota ran it, if any worker spotted anything wrong with a car on the production, they could go and press a big button, the whole production line would stop and all the attention of the management would be on the fixing the problem. It was a longterm thing, that they knew if they stopped and properly fixed this problem now, it would eliminate problems in the future and they would have better quality cars. That’s how Toyota runs its production.

Paul Green:
Whereas according to the book about Tesla, if you try and stop the production line when Teslas are going down, Elon Musk himself will come and shout at you. And, you could get fired as well. They would rather fix problems at the end of production than actually slow down production, so it’s a completely different way of manufacturing. I would rather run it the Toyota way, which might be a slower way to manufacture, but we certainly do this within our MSP Marketing Edge products. When we discover a problem, we pause, we look at what’s caused the problem, and then we systemize the problem away. It doesn’t mean we always fix it first time, but I would rather be doing that than doing fixes when we’ve actually released stuff, because that’s just time consuming, don’t you feel?

Paul Green:
You’ve got five things there. You’ve got getting the right staff, you’ve got having goals and targets. You’ve got systems, checklists and the right environment for success. This is how you control the chaos within your MSP.

Voiceover:
Here’s this week’s clever idea.

Paul Green:
Once, there was this lift, or call it an elevator if you prefer. But, this lift was too slow. People got into this lift on the ground floor and it just seemed to take them ages to get up to their destination. So they complained to the management of the building, “This lift is too slow, this lift is too slow.” And, the management got together and they looked at it and thought, “Oh, no. So many people are complaining and telling us that this lift is too slow. We’re going to have to get a new motor. It’s going to cost 100,000, but it’s the right thing to do, to get a new motor and to take this lift out of commission for a month, to change the motor and make the lift faster.”

Paul Green:
That’s not what they actually did, because the idea of this lift being too slow was not a real problem, it was only a perceived problem. The reality is that lift was performing exactly the same as all other lifts, it was exactly the speed that it should be going at. The problem was it just took too long for people to get to the floor. There was nothing they could do to upgrade that lift to make it physically go any faster. What they did, and I’m not sure if this is actually a real story or whether this is just something they teach in business school, at Harvard and places like that, what they did was they tackled the perception that there was a problem rather than the actual problem itself. This was not really a real problem, this was a perceived problem and it was solved by reframing it.

Paul Green:
Because the problem wasn’t that the lift was too slow, the problem was that the wait was too slow. People didn’t like waiting in the lift. What they did to fix this is they put up some mirrors and they started playing music in the lift. In fact, as I say that, that does actually feel like a real world solution, maybe back from the ’20s or ’30s, or something like that. So people thought there was a real problem that the lift was too slow, and actually it was a perceived problem because the real problem was the wait was too long. Putting up the mirrors and playing some music removed people’s perception of time. They didn’t realise how long they were having to wait for the lift to reach its destination.

Paul Green:
I think with every problem you have that your clients come and talk to you about, you can ask yourself, “Is this a real problem or is it just a perceived problem?” If we look at some specific tech problems that might come up, you might get your clients, their users, saying things to you like, “I never know when my problem will be fixed. I never know when my problem will be fixed.” Is that a real problem or is that a perceived problem? I think that’s a perceived problem because I never know when my problem will be fixed is actually their way of saying, “I just want to know when it’s going to be sorted so I can get on with my work. Why is it taking you guys so long to get back to me?” That’s what they’re saying this.

Paul Green:
Now, here’s another real world solution of a problem exactly like that being fixed. On the London tube network, for decades, people never knew when the next train was coming. They would constantly complain, “There aren’t enough trains, you need to add more trains. Blah, blah, blah, blah.” And then, what London Underground did was they put in some signage, some electronic signage, which tells people how long until the next train. Even if you’ve got to wait six or seven minutes until the next train, you instantly calm down because you can see that a train is coming and you know exactly how long that wait is. So actually, nothing has changed, there’s no extra capacity on these trains. What we’ve done is we’ve communicated better with people.

Paul Green:
It’s exactly the same at airports. When your plane is delayed, the reality is they don’t know how long the delay is going to be. But it’ll say, “Delayed for 60 minutes.” Because if it just says, “Delayed,” with no information, that’s actually quite annoying for you. Whereas if it says, “Delayed for 60 minutes or 90 minutes,” you’ve got some information.

Paul Green:
If you’ve got the problem that clients say to you is, “We never know when our problems are going to be fixed,” then take away the perceived problem by giving them a CX platform, for example, a customer experience platform, something like Invarosoft, or CloudRadial, or one of the others, where they can actually go in and see that you are doing something. Because whether you are actually doing something or not in the background is irrelevant, it’s about their perception that you are doing something. You and I know that you prioritise tickets, of course you do. “Please can I have a new user? By the way, they started this morning. Sorry, I forgot to tell you,” is an urgent problem but it’s not really an important one because it’s something that could have been communicated to you at any point within the last two weeks. So a CX platform, a customer experience platform would allow you to communicate with your clients about their perceived problem.

Paul Green:
Here’s another one. Is this a real problem or a perceived problem? Your techs feel overwhelmed. “There’s just too much to do, there’s too many tickets, there’s too many problems. The phone keeps ringing.” Now, unless genuinely your techs are so overwhelmed and there’s just too much work coming in, the reality is this is, again, probably a perceived problem. For someone who’s interrupted by the phone every 10 minutes or so when they’re trying to do something else, that can feel like a real problem. I know I find it very hard to get decent work done if I’m interrupted all the time. So hey, let’s deal with the perception here. If they feel overwhelmed, let’s put someone on phone duty, let’s have a phone rota. What if one person is responsible for answering the phones for the whole morning, and then it switches to someone else in the afternoon? What if you did daily ticket huddles, or even twice daily ticket huddles, where you and your techs, you stop and you look at the tickets, and you help to reframe the problem in their minds.

Paul Green:
Because often, that thing of, “Oh, we’ve got too many tickets, we need another tech,” is just that there is a lot of work to do and they don’t know where to get started. The mind throws up that this is a resourcing issue, “We need more people,” and actually, that’s not the answer at all. That’s what they think the problem is, they think it’s a real problem that they’re under resourced, and actually it’s a perceived problem. They just need to get organised and you can help them, once or twice a day with a ticket huddle, to get organised.

Paul Green:
So the next time a problem crops up, whether it’s clients or staff, and you can see it’s an ongoing thing, it’s not just a one-off problem, it’s going to happen again and again, ask yourself, “Is this a real problem or is it a perceived problem?” If it is a perceived one, the question is how can you reframe this to just completely eliminate the perception that there’s a problem at all.

Voiceover:
Paul’s blatant plug.

Paul Green:
There’s an amazing free resource where you can discuss with me and other MSPs how to grow your business, how to improve your marketing, grow your monthly recurring revenue and ultimately, make more money out of your MSP. Now, it’s a Facebook group, it’s completely free for MSPs and it is only for MSPs. We don’t allow any vendors in here, at all. If you go into Facebook, go onto Groups, or just in your search bar at the top, type in MSP Marketing. You’ll see a group pop up with my lovely face on it, just click on that. A couple of questions, just to prove you’re an MSP and we will let you into that group. There’s some awesome stuff discussed in there.

Paul Green:
Here’s on here. “Do you offer one package, a good, better, best package, or something different?” We’ve got eight comments from different MSPs, telling us what they actually offer. That’s a good one, there.

Paul Green:
Here’s another one. “A hypothetical question. Do you think alcohol is a suitable thank you gift to a client you don’t know well?” 43 comments on that one, that’s an enormous topic. Some people are saying on this, “Yes, just give people alcohol, it’s fine.” Others saying, “No, you can’t do it,” and all sorts of opinions in between. That was a great topic of conversation, that one.

Paul Green:
This is a good one. This is from Adam Dodds. “Whenever I find myself crawling under a desk, tidying cables, I hear Paul in my ear.” And then it’s in quote marks. “As soon as your client sees your butt crack, you lose the ability to sell cybersecurity.” I love that, Adam. Thank you very much. I know I’ve said that in the podcast before, and I’ve said that across a whole range of different videos as well.

Paul Green:
So listen, if you’re not in this resource, this is the place to be if you want to discuss marketing and growing your MSP. It’s a free Facebook group, just go in and look for MSP Marketing.

Voiceover:
The big interview.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Hi, I’m Stephen Rosenthal, with Managed Services Platform. Excited to be a part of this podcast episode.

Stephen Rosenthal:
We are specialising in partnering with MSPs while serving their clients, specifically around setting a strategic roadmap for their clients and helping them to understand how to have high level, strategy level conversations with clients.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Me, personally, I come from an entrepreneurial background, with sales and marketing. So very accustomed to having that type of conversation with clients. And, excited to be a part of the podcast to help dive a little bit into how you, as an MSP, can utilise strategic conversations with clients to grow your relationship with them.

Paul Green:
Yeah. We had Adam Walter from Managed Services Platform on the podcast, it was about six, seven weeks ago or so. I appreciate you joining us as well, Stephen.

Paul Green:
Now, what I want to talk about today is technology roadmaps because I know it’s something that’s hard baked into the service that you offer to MSPs. It was something that I hadn’t actually come across until I think it was about two years or so ago, and actually, someone was talking to me about your very service.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Nice.

Paul Green:
I was in a room with a whole load of other MSPs, and we brought it up on the screen and we looked at it. The MSP I was talking to started talking to everyone about the power of technology roadmaps. Let’s make this a technology roadmap 101 and we’ll start right at the beginning.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Yes.

Paul Green:
What is a technology roadmap?

Stephen Rosenthal:
Honestly, it’s not necessarily a one-size-fits-all. We have a template that helps an MSP build out a technology roadmap. But, the idea is really to have a conversation, as an MSP, with your client, with the leadership team of your client, and have the IT expertise towards that strategy and towards that high level conversation with the business. It helps you to position yourself as a go-to leader in your client’s business, from an IT perspective, and build out how does the strategic direction of your client impact the IT strategy that you have. How is IT going to really enable that strategic vision of your client? I think that’s really, from a high level, what a strategic review that you have with clients, what that looks like.

Stephen Rosenthal:
And then, as far as what that practically looks like, the nature of any business, they all have different strategy, different roadmaps, different ideas on where they want to go as a business. Your actual conversation needs to be structured in a way, but have the flexibility to fit the specific client that you’re working with. Obviously, Paul and I, our two companies would have a different strategy than a veterinarian clinic, as opposed to an accounting firm. There would be a lot of different strategy conversations, but there’s a context and a template to build out that roadmap with your customer.

Paul Green:
Yeah, that makes perfect sense. So essentially, the technology roadmap is there as a tool to get you and your client to work together, thinking about their business in the future. I guess, implicitly in that, they are then internally and emotionally committing to you implementing that plan. That what makes it so powerful.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Obviously, MSPs, you have your recurring revenue that is important, obviously it’s what you build your business around. I think with an IT strategic roadmap, you’re inherently building out a plan for five, three, one year to come. That obviously locks in not only your recurring revenue for that time, to keep you sticky at that client, but then it also gives you opportunity to build out projects. A NIS security assessment, or anything within cyber, obviously that’s a big topic for strategy for any business now. Even onboarding employees, how are you going to scale out your infrastructure, what’s the plan for that? Or, if it’s like the veterinary clinic idea, if you have iPads in the clinics, in the rooms to build a diagnosis for the pets that you’re treating, and have that built into a backend system. How do we build out that service for your client’s client and have an IT infrastructure conversation to help enable that strategic direction?

Stephen Rosenthal:
It obviously helps with stickiness. It helps have a longer term conversation, as opposed to hopping on a call, having your account manager hop on a call with a client as an MSP and talk about how you did with ticket response time, satisfaction, what does it look like for your server patches, did that happen, automated. Those are important things, but you’re not having that next level conversation that’s going to make you a longterm partner with your client.

Stephen Rosenthal:
One of the things that we want to do with MSPL is make that a turnkey process for an MSP. As you can imagine, not every account manager is going to be thinking like a business owner. So if we’re able to have a turnkey solution that helps map out that conversation, that’s really what we’re looking to do with our platform.

Paul Green:
In terms of actually presenting the technology roadmap to your client, what’s the most efficient way to show them what you’ve discussed and what they’ve emotionally agreed to, without actually baffling them with a whole load of technology, and service stats and stuff?

Stephen Rosenthal:
Yeah. I think one of the benefits to the way that we’ve structured our platform is we roll up data into very visually digestible graphs, charts, things along those lines. Timelines that are easily digestible for anybody in the business.

Stephen Rosenthal:
But then, also, at the executive level, when you’re showing, “Okay, this is what the budget looks like,” you don’t necessarily need to list out every IP address of the servers that you’re going to roll out, or of the mobile device management platform of all the phones that you’re going to be managing as they scale out their business, and implements better security. You don’t need that level of detail. But, you may, for some clients, so we have that drill down type ability within our templates. So you can roll up all that information, make it very digestible for those clients that really want the executive summary. And then, also, how is that going to influence the bottom line? How is that going to influence their actual budgetary planning for IT?

Stephen Rosenthal:
I just had a conversation with a client yesterday, of ours, it was really great. They were talking about how, if you’re not going to upgrade X today or in this next quarter and you want to push that out to the beginning of 2022, being able to outline, “This is how that’s going to influence your day-to-day and your strategy as a business.” It helps to have that tie everything all together. You’re going to set the agenda from the business strategy, “We want to get into, as a law firm, we want to start serving accounting companies. We need this type of file management software, we need this type of CRM to do that,” all sorts of different technology, software and infrastructure in order to build out that deliverable as a business. And then, when you drill down to the budget conversation, you’re like, “Okay, we can push out finding a CRM for this target market that you want to go after. How is that going to influence the business? What’s the cost to the business by pushing off an IT cost?”

Stephen Rosenthal:
I think that’s been really helpful. One, to summarise, rolling up all that information into easily digestible, visual aids. And then, also, how does that directly influence budget and finance, so that they can help lay out what that roadmap is going to look like from a budgetary standpoint.

Paul Green:
Okay, final question, Stephen. The answer to this is not allowed to be, “Just get Managed Services Platform,” because you can have your plug in a second. But, if you’ve never done technology roadmaps before, or maybe even if you’re not doing regular, quarterly business reviews, strategic reviews with your clients, what’s the easiest way to get started?

Stephen Rosenthal:
Start to think about the strategy of your clients and the business level with your clients. Try to pull your head out of the day-to-day of the help desk and the infrastructure management, the patch upgrades, things like that and try to lift your head up and think about what does my client business look like in a year from now, in two years from now. Just that simple task I think helps set your frame of mind different when interacting with a client. And then, obviously step two is how do I then engage that client in that conversation, from the perspective of their IT expert and their IT resource.

Stephen Rosenthal:
I think those two simple steps are really important. Obviously, the tools and tactics are also important. But, I think from a high level, if you’re able to do those two things, that really helps level up the conversations you’re having with clients.

Paul Green:
That’s really powerful, thank you. Right, you’re free plug, then. Tell us briefly about Managed Services Platform, and what’s the best way to have a look at it and maybe even get in touch with you.

Stephen Rosenthal:
The actual solution, we have some great videos on our website on how to utilise the solution. The crux of what we offer is being able to do just what we’re talking about now, implementing a template that’s going to build out those visual aids to help you have that conversation with your client. And not just present, “Hey, this is what you have to do, this is what you need to do,” but build it out as a conversation. With the end goal of both budget is allocated for those upgrades or for those strategic plans, but then also have the what are those strategic plans really baked out from an IT perspective. That’s with out-of-the-box templates within our solution, that you can plug right into, with integrations to your RMMs, PSAs, whatever acronym you want to throw in there. You have those integrations, out of the box, ready to go, to utilise our tool in those conversations.

Stephen Rosenthal:
To get in touch with us, you can always visit us on our website, managedservicesplatform.com. But, I think the best way would be to shoot me an email direct at Stephen.rosenthal@managedservicesplatform.com. Hopefully, I didn’t ask Paul and he can cut this out if need be, but if you could link to that in the show notes, I think that would be a great way to drive people towards our email address.

Paul Green:
Yeah, we’ll definitely link to that in the show notes. Thanks, Stephen, you’ve been a great guest.

Stephen Rosenthal:
Yeah. Thank you, Paul. I appreciate the opportunity.

Voiceover:
Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast, this week’s recommended book.

Alex Robinson:
Hi, I’m Alex Robinson from Novus Digital. I’m an SEO professional and my book recommendation is 12 Rules of Life by Jordan Peterson. The reason that I’m recommending this book is not only for how it helped me in my general, every day life, but also in starting up Novus Digital and starting my first business. It goes through 12 fundamental rules for life. It’s tongue-in-cheek and has a lot of value in terms of growing as a person, how to hold yourself, and how to contain yourself in both the business and personal world. And also, how to look after yourself and take care of others.

Voiceover:
Coming up next week.

Jude Charles:
Hi, my name is Jude Charles, and I am a filmmaker helping entrepreneurs leverage the power of storytelling. Next week, I will be on the Paul Green MSP Show to help you understand how you can leverage the power of video storytelling in your business.

Paul Green:
We’re also going to be looking at the prospect journey. From the point that someone Googles IT support in your town, to them looking on your website, to their first interactions with you, can you map out the ideal journey? What would you want people to do? What would you want them to look at? What marketing materials would you want to expose them to? We’re going to be looking at that next week. And of course, I’ve got a series of suggestions for you. Plus, we’ll be looking at how you can make your business a little bit better every single day, just by focusing on data points. When you get to a certain stage of business development, it’s the data that tells you what’s happening within the business. You’ve just got to leverage that data in the right way to make the right series of improvements.

Paul Green:
All of that’s coming up. Join me, next Tuesday, and have a very profitable week in your MSP.

Voiceover:
Made in the UK for MSPs around the world, Paul Green’s MSP Marketing Podcast.

Get a FREE paperback copy of my book on MSP marketing called: "Updating servers doesn't grow your business"


Essential Guide to Marketing and growing your MSP or IT Support Business | Paul Green's MSP Marketing

Inside you'll discover how to systemise your marketing, sales and delivery so you can stress less, grow your MSP and enjoy a better work / life balance

Join 3,623 MSPs worldwide who already have a copy of this book.

Leave a Reply